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Coti ID pls.

life2short1971

Well-Known Member
The long one looks like the top of Les Latneuses to me. I do not know on the other but perhaps Dressante au Bleu and side closeups are very beneficial in determining what you have.
 

garyhaywood

Well-Known Member
scotts right on with the smaller one being a la drassante au blue. not sure on the other one probably scott is right on

gary
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
You guys are spot on.
The richt one is indeed a La Dressanfe au Bleu. No doubt about it.
The left one shares several unique features with this Les Latneuses from the Vault:
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. I must be the same layer, even if this is a glued specimen.

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

MichaelS

Member
Thanks Bart! The Lateneuse is a recent arrival (impulse and blind purchase :blush: ). I have only used it once, the slurry turns black/thick faster than the other one; as I learnt on the Dressante au Bleu (my first coti a few months ago and which has produced excellent Unicot results,) I have to remember to adjust the little technique that I have when I switch between the two :)

PS dumb question, who gave names to the veins, when and for what reason (and what do some of them mean)?
 

garyhaywood

Well-Known Member
I have both layer s you have the leslat is rapid on slurry. I have had perfect dilucot edges recently of that layer. while la dr au blue is normal much slower on slurry the same edges with dilucot are very much the same. Sounds like you have a great bevel setter with your leslat. i normaly use my fastest layer for removing tiny chips and setting realy dull bevels. then i'll move to a slower coti and dilucot. this way both get some use .

Cheers gary
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Michael,

The names of the layers are historical. There origin is found in the local dialect of the Coticule Miners, 100's of years ago. They likely named the layers according to properties connected to how they look "in the wild", location in relation to other layers, etc.

Best regards,
Bart.
 
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