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Finishing and the crosshatch

BlacknTan

Well-Known Member
I don't know if this has been discussed or not, but I'm interested in everyone's thoughts on altering the direction of one's strokes a bit on finishing as opposed to the half stroke pattern.
In cylinder refinishing, a crosshatch pattern during honing is desired, and on some cases, a very specific angle is called for. This provides for a more highly polished finish as parts become accustomed to one another, i.e. "break-in."
During my half strokes, and finishing, I find my motions to be basically the same in terms of the direction of the scratch pattern, but it occurred to me that if these scratches went in slightly different directions, it would provide for bettert burnishing action from stropping, and perhaps a smoother edge?
I think that the use of circles during the process would negate the desirability, and usefulness of this entire endeavor, but lately, I've been trying to do my final finishing strokes with more of a "circular" type of X stroke, just to try to change the direction of the scratch pattern a bit.

Is this worthwhile? Does my theory have any validity, and has anyone done this or tried it?
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
There is merit in your reasoning. I think the only way to really know the answer is to run an extensive comparative study, using a set of identical razor and one finishing hone. That's the only way to tell for sure whether a specific approach makes a difference.

Interesting stuff.:thumbup:

Bart.
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Yes, I've tried it, albeit having no bacgkround in cylinder refinishing at all - I followed the same logics. You must reverse your stroke to do it, i.e. start with the point on the hone and go towards the heel, which feels a little awkward to me. Probably the reason why I'm not able to tell, if it made particular difference, I haven't developed a comfortable "reversed" stroke, so I was just doing it occasionally.

regards,
Matt
 

BlacknTan

Well-Known Member
For those much more ambidextrous than myself, a crosshatch pattern could be achieved by doing alternating sets of regular X strokes, but with different hands.
 

vgeorge

Well-Known Member
You might consider (slightly and) constantly changing the orientation of the hone, as well.

People who clean/polish the blade surface by hand change the orientation of the stroke each time they move to a higher grit sandpaper. It is easier to remove the scratches that way.
 

mysteryrazor

Well-Known Member
The cross hatch pattern on cylinders is better at seating the rings. In other words cutting away at the rings until they form to the shape of the cylinder. But you make a good point. When you are lapping a plate a figure 8 lap is flatter than a back and forth lap. If you lap a straight edge it will be straighter if you hold the straight edge at 45 degrees and lap in a straight line. All parts of the edge are moving the same amount on the lap and should have equal pressure.

Some of the principles are present in our lapping strokes. In fact the x stroke tends to ware the middle of the blade. When I restore an edge that requires mass metal removal I use various strokes to keep the edge as straight as possible. After reading someones post about narrow stones I used the side of my King 4000 with half strokes to remove the high spots in a blade. I hold the razor against my Harbor Freight four sided diamond hone ($9.99 when on sale) and view the edge up to the light.
 
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