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Gluing a bbw/coticule back together....

Phlier

Active Member
100+ year old glue was bound to fail at some point. It just happened to be today. I *knew* I shouldn't use my 100+ year old Pike brand coticule, but I just couldn't help it.

I went to use it as a slurry stone today, and the coticule layer fell off of the BBW backing stone, and onto my green coti. Luckily, the thin layer of coticule didn't crack when it fell.

So after allowing the BBW/coti to dry for a few days, I'm planning on using epoxy to glue the two halves back together. Thought I'd better hit you guys up to see if epoxy is ok for this, or if some other glue might be better?
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Epoxy will serve just fine.

Glad to hear that the pieces weren't broken. :)

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

Harvitz81

Well-Known Member
I had a combo slurry stone come apart on me that I just used some 5 minute epoxy to get back together. After it dried I cleaned up some of the ooze that came out the sides and it was as good as new.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Mild heat, like a hairdryer. The old glue is usually a mixture of beeswax and hide glue. Hide glue softens with heat.

Best regards,
Bart.
 

Phlier

Active Member
That worked perfectly, Bart, thank you. :thumbup:

I used a good, thick layer of epoxy, to make sure the entire surface of both stones (they're not very smooth on the glued sides) was covered in glue to prevent any air bubbles or areas that aren't "supported". The coti layer is so thin, I don't want any areas unsupported to prevent cracking. Of course, that meant squeezing some epoxy out the sides, but it is a stable mount.
 

DJKELLY

Well-Known Member
Before the epoxy dries completely it is an easy task to trim the excess with something sharp if you can find it, now that your hone is out of commission. A utility knife works well in my woodshop for this. Epoxy is probably the best glue you could have used for the delicate coticule layer application. Regards, Denny
 

Phlier

Active Member
Thanks, Dennis! An Exacto blade worked well for this.

Off topic: I saw in another post where you mentioned that you always say thanks to those who serve our country on every flight... Are you a fellow airline crew member by chance?
 

mysteryrazor

Well-Known Member
Retired TWA/aa maintenance and I still have not looked for my thinset for my coticule. You guys know anything about Stinsons? Have a flap and aileron I need identified.
 

DJKELLY

Well-Known Member
Lucky you. I guess you know how bad they raped us. For a while we had the best working conditions in the industry with the "Bid Sheet" where we all just threw our trips into a pile and sorted it out by seniority. You didn't have to give up your trip, but could if there was a better one. Gone. Retirement, gone. Pay, Gone. Vacation, gone. Management, assholes. Your first officers make more than me on the same equipment, and I have over 30 years with this company alone. But I'm not pissed. Really. Ok, I'm pissed. If I didn't put it all in perspective I would go nuts, but the truth is we leave with nothing anyway and I am luckier than 99.99% of all the humans who have ever lived, and that IS the truth.

I lived in SAN for 15 years and spent many nights in LAS. A strange city, kinda like looking behind "Pirates of the Caribbean" at Disney when you see it in the daylight.

I miss not being able to take a straight on flights, but have recently started using DEs for the first time due to many kindnesses directly my way from guys here. It's much better than nothing and I have a nice travel brush an a decent kit. It is amazing how something as simple as a good shave can wash away a fourteen hour, five leg day.

I seem to remember you didn't have much in the way of stones. If you need a little help getting restarted, send me a pm and I'll get you a great stone you won't have to baby.

Your jealous pal, Denny
 

Phlier

Active Member
Hey Denny,

Yeah, I've had a bunch of USAir guys in the jumpseat over the past couple years. It's just such an incredible mess. :(

I was born and raised in the foray... Dad was Western/Delta. Retired in 1990. His brother was Real Delta. My brother is currently at Delta, too. Mom was a flight attendant for United.

I was at a regional from 1989 til 2006. Military wouldn't take me cause I didn't have natural 20-20 vision. So I went civilian. First interviewed at Southwest in 1993. Got hired in 2006. If you're gonna screw up an interview, go big or go home, right? ;)

Dad wanted to work for Pan Am, Eastern, Frontier, or Braniff. Ended up at Western. If Delta hadn't come along, he would have ended up being out of work. It's all such a gamble.

I really appreciate the stone offer. According to my wife, I have no stones at all/too many stones. Wish she'd make up her mind...

I'm really loving my two coticules, but I must admit I'm anxious to throw some artificials in the mix. As much as I love the coticule's smoothness, I just can't quite seem to get that final bit of keenness I used to be able to get by running through my Shapton GS's from 1k through 30k, then following that with the coti/water. Still knocking around the idea of selling one of my coticules so I can go back to a similar progression, but the thought of parting with either one of them is kinda tough.
 

DJKELLY

Well-Known Member
I promise, you have the tools you need already. Artificials are very easy, but with a bit of attention and learning when to progress with your slurry (think thin) you can get all you will need from your coticules. Many of the vintage stones were very rapid, so thin slurry there is specially important. Good luck. Denny
 

Phlier

Active Member
Thanks for the encouragement, Denny. :)

Your statement about the speed of vintage stones is very well taken. The old Pike (the reason for this thread) is amazingly fast. It's such a great stone, I'm just in tears that it's almost completely worn out. I'd love to replace it, but I just don't know if it's really replaceable by the current stones/veins on the market.

I'm thinking I'll stick with these two for a bit longer... see if I can get back to the results I was getting before I stopped honing every day. But I may end up selling my La Verte and keeping the Pike for finishing.

Today, though, I'm stuck with the green coti and it's slurry stone. The Pike isn't going to see water until the epoxy has cured for at least 24 hours.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
FloorPizza said:
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But incorrect, I'm afraid. You'll find the same speed variations in vintage hones as is recently mined ones I state that from personal observations, but it is also quite logical: we're talking about the same rock. A few decades more or less under the ground doesn't alter the properties of rock that was formed over 400000000 years ago.

It does seem that the quality gradations in the old days, were primarily based on speed. Expensive grades with famous names as "Old Rock" and "Old Hickory", are generally faster Coticules. But not every vintage Coticule is an Old Rock or Old Hickory.


Kind regards,
Bart.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Emmanuel, if you post pictures, I'll gladly take a look.

But you mustn't expect too much. It's usually ipossible to determine the layer names of vintage Coticules. There were many different mining spots in the old days. All accessed one of 4 existing principle Coticule deposits. As the veins run up and down in the underground, in more or less, sinusoidal layers, mining spots located several km apart could still be mining the same layers. Every mine had it's own names for the layers they extracted. Sometimes they even used the same name for layers of a different deposit. I can't possibly know the morphology of layers and deposits that haven't been accessed for decades, unless we would find a printed source with proper descriptions. I doubt such a source exists.

What I can determine with some success, are the layer names of the Ol'Preu location, as they have been since the 18the century over there (likely earlier). The current Ardennes Coticule still quarries over there nowadays, which makes it of course easier. That, and the fact that Ol' Preu has been reasonable well documented in the past. Witf your knowledge of French, you might enjoy reading this little
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. Not all information is accurate, certainly concerning the quality ratings of the various layers described in the booklet, but it's still an interesting read.

Kind regards,
Bart.
 
G

Guest

Bart said:
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Thank you very much Bart. I ll read the booklet. To morrow ill send the pfotos just for a look.However are not many.Just two, as you know the old was minimalist.
Best regards
Emmanuel
 
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