Improved Dilucot procedure

Bart

Well-Known Member
Gentlemen,

I've made a quick & dirty video showing the updated version of the Dilucot procedure. I'm honing a Henkels Friodur with massive spine wear, a wide bevel and a bit of a frowning curve at the edge. Not an easy razor to sharpen, because it's in actual need of some some edge reshaping (which it will get later tonight), but for the sake of a quick demonstration, it'll have to do. The video is shot in one long sequence, showing the entire procedure from dull to finished for shaving. (It only needs a decent stropping on linen and leather) I'm passing the the HHT a couple of times at the end of the video, you guys will have to take my word for it, because that kind of detail didn't survive Youtube's video processing.

Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!


More quick and dirty information in this thread:
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!


I'll do a decent write-up and video later, when I've figured out the minimal requirements for the dilution phase. I think I'm doing overkill at present.

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

garyhaywood

Well-Known Member
Bart i noticed you move your index finger to differant areas of the spine when honing . Could explain why you do this? I should imagine this works that area the most.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Thats what I do mate. And sometimes i just work one area of the blade if it needs it. The tricky bit for me is judgin if i can make an area catch up by workin it, or if i have to work off the area next to it, if you know what i mean mate?
 

garyhaywood

Well-Known Member
yes mate . I often use marker if i'm unsure , just to make sure i'm hitting the whole edge. With the half sstrokes i have found on one acasssion i went a bit mad in one area and over did it and the bevel formed wider than i wanted. To much pressure in one spot. The heal needs a little more work i find as it spends less time on the hone.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
garyhaywood said:
The heal needs a little more work i find as it spends less time on the hone.
I sometimes use that as an indicator, you know when your setting the bevel and test arm hair, I find if the heel shaves but the rest of the edge falls behind it can show that your slurry is off, so I thin it a bit and do another set or so half strokes, without worrying if the heel gets any work, does the trick every time :thumbup:
 

garyhaywood

Well-Known Member
slurry can deceive the edge. if my thumb just grips the edge i start diluting. It saves on arm hair at one point i was running low.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
garyhaywood said:
Bart i noticed you move your index finger to differant areas of the spine when honing . Could explain why you do this? I should imagine this works that area the most.
A good observation Gary. I always move my finger around when doing halfstrokes. Mostly as a precaution to avoid that one part of the edge would receive too much attention. The finger does favor the spot right underneath a bit. It can also be used to help a part a bit that stays behind during a heavy bevel setting job. Once the bevel is fine, it's generally not needed to place the finger strategically. But I just keep moving it around.

On another note: I don't always stroke the entire edge. As long as there a diagonal motion, it's perfectly fine to work part of the edge only.

Best regards,
Bart.
 

torbenbp

Well-Known Member
Great video Sir Bart...That will be very helpfull! Did try the improved method but got ...nothing!:D

This will surely help a great deal. But by God its depressing to watch the speed at wich you hone hehehehe:thumbup:

Regards gents.

ps. "I´ll go and shit my pants" ....you had a very clewer grand father!
 

Paul

Well-Known Member
Am I the only one that is disappointed in that video? :confused:


There was no perfect music to go with it :D

Very nice, Sir. Should prove very helpful. Thank you! :thumbup:
 

garyhaywood

Well-Known Member
Bart are you you still using this method ? if so are the results more consistant? is any one else using this method as there normal honing routine?

i have found it works very wwell in a quarter of the time. the rsults are just as good if not better.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
I am using this as we speak, its all I do now a days. very very rarely I find it fails and end up going unicot, but its rare, its so quick and easy that if all else fails its nothing to go back to a light slurry and dilute through to finish.

It is for me, and you too it would seem, a real real joy, anyone who has good honing skills should find this method easy, I love it :thumbup:

Best wishes
Ralfson (Dr)
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
garyhaywood said:
Bart are you you still using this method ? if so are the results more consistant? is any one else using this method as there normal honing routine?

I have found it works very well in a quarter of the time. the results are just as good if not better.
Yes, I haven't looked back. It's faster than the old method.
It happens that I need to try a few different finishing strategies before the edge passes the HHT as I want it. That was also the case with the old method. I wouldn't have updated the Dilucot article if I didn't think this approach had the advantage.
I have found that, just like with the old method, you can't afford to rush through the method with the wrong frame of mind.
Today, I wrote something in an e-mail to Stewart, I'm sure he won't mind me recycling my own words:
[note]it happens that I become overconfident, and my Coticule reminds me that it likes to be handled with patient competence, instead of overzealous cockiness. This is one of the main reasons why I love these hones so much. Coticules invite us to enter a calm and controlled frame of mind. They require simultaneous control over several senses, "mindfulness" if I'm allowed to use that word. That is the reason why you have almost instantaneous success with a Coticule (Stewart is a Buddhist), and also why some guys don't get it.[/note]

Do you think the old Dilucot method was better, Gary?

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

garyhaywood

Well-Known Member
the older method was hard work at times i got faster at it. the new method is a doddle. And it works just as well infact i would say i have had some razors pop hair of the hone as if i had stropped it. And like ralfy has just said it's no problem to reach back to a slurry and start agian. I also find the method keeps the ares of the blade that can escape the hone at times in contact a lot better. i used it on every razor i honed since you introduced this method. i still don't quite get there on say ti or the inox puma was a pain. only in the smoothness area i guess some razors are just stubben
 
Top