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Joseph Rodgers & Son 6/8

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
A mild restore for this old girl, a gift from a friend in New Zealand, half way round the world and back for this English beauty, all original as far as I could tell, I even have the box marked "the star and cross razor"
haven't shaved with it yet, thats for tomorrow, and the pictures are not the best.

Anyway, I removed the blade and cleaned it up, using my mops and 2 grades of greasless, and 3 polishing componds, there were a few heavily rusted spots, but I was able to save the etch, the bakelite scales had lines cut into them at the pivot end, who knows why? so they got some TLC as well.

Re-pinned with antique washers and home made pin, here she is fresh from her hibernation:

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Many thanks for looking Chaps
Regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 
G

Guest

Good job Ralfy.
Even stayed a little stains it looks like a personality razor.
Rgds
Emmanuel
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Thank you my friend, it was rather rusty, and I dont like to polish the life out of them too much, after all this may be 100yrs old, I dont believe it hurts to have a little age spot or two.

Best regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
Indeed I too prefer women “not so perfectly dolled”… razors too.

Looks like you have outdone yourself again my friend. She is now a real keeper.:thumbup:

I suspect that blade was forged in Sheffield and ground in Germany… there was a period in history when Sheffield cutlers sent razor blanks to Germany to be fully hollow ground.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the kind words my friend, the reverse of the tang is marked " ground in Sheffield" so I guess this old girl is an North of England thoroughbred ... Lol

I know from the "England" marking that she is post 1890, due to the change in taxation and export law around that time, would you have any idea of a more accurate year of manufacture?

My kindest regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 
G

Guest

tat2Ralfy said:
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JOSEPH RODGERS (ROGERS) & SONS
Norfolk St., Sheffield
Appointed cutlers to His Majesty King George IV in 1821; chosen as one of 5 firms to make cutlery speciments for presentation to the Duke of York in 1826 ("Old Sheffield Razors"

It helps Ralfy?
Emmanuel
 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
tat2Ralfy said:
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Indeed I was looking at the “Hamburg Ring” etching, and assumed such a phrase would only appear on a German ground blade (I understand “Hamburg Ring” is trademarked).
However if they went through the trouble to “stamp” Ground in Sheffield then I will believe it rather than an etch on the face.

I am attempting to discover the when Sheffield grinders began to use full hollow grinding machines instead of sending blanks to Germany to be finished… that would help to date such razors.

Still searching.
 

matt321

Member
tat2Ralfy said:
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This one is very nice and has a great story too. Glad it wasn't necessary to grind and polish it down to an amorphous piece of shiney metal. I hate it when that happens.

I've seen lines and grooves at the pivot on some razos that I assumed were caused by filing the pin heads for re-scaling.
 

mysteryrazor

Well-Known Member
There must have been a fellow in the Los Angeles area that did a lot of work his work is distinctive. I do not know how many razors I have repinned because he made scratches prying the washers off or filling the heads into the scales and then peining the pin flush with no washer. Pinned two last night.
 

mysteryrazor

Well-Known Member
Some of the marks are barbers marks. When there were "Five Barbers no waiting" and barbers used razors they marked their razors for the same reason mechanics mark tools.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Now that makes a lot of sense, however in the case of this one I don't see any hone wear, so I assume the owner was no Barber, or a not busy one for sure, I guess lots of folks mark things for many reasons, I have seen lots of marks on lots of razors, the ones that stick in my mind are the Soldiers marks, hard times back then, and now for a working Soldier bless them.

Regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 

Jens

Well-Known Member
That is one fine restore!

I have a Jolly Roger very similar to this one.
Need I say that it's coticule edge is as smooth & gentle as anything?

Great job there Doctor!
 
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