Question about coticules..

mitchshrader

Well-Known Member
I'm curious about other (than straight razor) uses for coticules and BBW's, and whether particular stones would be less appropriate for razors and more fitting to use on cutlery.

I have several combination Coticule/BBW hones and a couple of the larger single-grit BBW's, as well as various hones from translucent/Extra Hard Arkansas to a variety of japanese and european. I've grown the habit of using specific ones on specific knives. My problem is, I don't want to degrade a fine razor hone sharpening knives more than absolutely necessary, and even moreso I don't wish to STOP using belgian hones, but would appreciate a little guidance to use them most appropriately.



Any clues, hints, or insights? ;)
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Hi Mitch,

Welcome to Coticule.be

For general knives and tools use, a harder Coticule is recommended. You can lean a bit more onto them, without the edge scraping the surface, which can happen on the softer ones.
I use the BBW to touch up plane blades and chisels, by making use of the "hollow bevel" method, and I have excellent and quick results on it. I reckon you are familiar with the "hollow bevel" approach? I use the BBW with a thin slurry, never just water.

Pocket knives and other utility knives, I sharpen on a Coticule. Small imperfection are removed on slurry. Finishing and quick touch-ups on water. I'm not afraid to put some pressure on the blade, but as said, that requires a harder Coticule. If your Coticule starts releasing a lot for slurry while honing on water with some pressure, you have a softer stone, excellent for low pressure honing.

We should add a few general sharpening articles to the "Coticule Sharpening Academy". With your long-term experience, maybe we can cooperate on that in some future.

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

mitchshrader

Well-Known Member
long perhaps, but very narrow. I know how to put a properly burnished convex edge on a cooking knife, and won't back up from that brag. But that's it. I'm curious about all the stuff I don't know, which is everything else. :)
 

kishti22

Member
Hi Guys,
I am interested in a hone that does both Chefs knifes and razors. I understand the need for a harder stone. Does a harder stone still exhibit just as good properties for razor sharpening, any help much appreciated
michael:)
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
kishti22 said:
Hi Guys,
I am interested in a hone that does both Chefs knifes and razors. I understand the need for a harder stone. Does a harder stone still exhibit just as good properties for razor sharpening, any help much appreciated
michael:)
Hi Michael,

Most Coticules will do chefs knives and razors just fine, if you're prepared to let the hone do the cutting. Some knife sharpeners are inclined to put more pressure than needed on a blade. On a really soft Coticule, that could get you into trouble, because the knife can start scraping the hone. But it's only a problem on the softest Coticules. For honing narrow tools, such a chisels and gouges, it's more important to get a harder one.
For razors, the general consensus is that their hard steel needs soft hones. Soft means that the hone abrades faster, refreshing the abrasive surface at a continuous rate. It sounds plausible, and on synthetic water hones it probably is. But on Coticules, I have not found much empirical evidence to sustain such a claim. I've tested softer hones that were slow and harder hones that were fast. But also the other way round. Very little can be predicted out of a Coticule's hardness.
There currently is one available in the Coticule Vault, that I consider excellent for honing it all: razors, chisels, knives, anything but scissors. It's n°11. Also n°18 qualifies as such, but that one might be spoken for. Someone declared interest to purchase by the time I take it back to Ardennes (probably near the end February).
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Best regards,
Bart.
 
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