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THE RAZOR ALPHABET

Bart

Well-Known Member
Gentlemen,

the goal of this thread is to work on a list of razor related topics, such as a declaration of terminology, methods used for honing and repairing razors, etc...

Everyone is free to add to the list and suggest improvements for already present lemmas.

Once the list gains some maturity, we'll compile it into an article for the Sharpening Academy (see the main menu of this website).

We will also try to add cross-references and additional links.

Here's an example:



Smile, smiling edge: when the edge of a razor razor has a curve that bulges outwards. The opposite of a frown [link to "frown"]. Requires special approach for sharpening, see under: "rolling X-stroke". [link to drawing or picture of a smiling razor]

Tang: Part of the razor between the pivot and the shoulder of a straight razor. Used to hold the razor with a pinch grip, while shaving. Very often stamped with makers marks. Jimps for a better grip are often present.


Please feel free to add to the list.
We're in search of a volunteer to follow up this thread.

Bart.
 

justin

Well-Known Member
Jimps: The serrations sometimes found on the bottom and/or the top of the tang. Their purpose is to provide a better grip on the razor, because things tend to get a little slippery when wet, and dropping a straight razor ain't a pretty sight. Their usefulness is subjective. Picture of jimps.

Frown, frowning edge: When the edge of the razor is concaved towards the spine of the razor, making it appear like a frown. Opposite of a smile. Frowns should be removed before honing the razor. Picture of a frown. Removing a frown.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Way to go Justin!

If all members throw in their 2 cents, we'll have a great Alphabet at no time.

:thumbup:

Bart.
 

justin

Well-Known Member
Bart, if you want I can create a text file with all this info in it, and keep it up to date. Then when it's time to get it up in the Sharpening Academy it won't be so difficult for you.

Justin
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Excellent plan. Go for it. If you want, I can give you contributor's access to the back end of Coticule.be, where you could maintain the document directly, and make it available to the public when you're ready to do so.

Thank you, Justin,

Bart.
 

pedalpowersailing

Well-Known Member
Straight razor = A razor consisting of a stiff steel blade hinged to a handle (scales) into which it slips when not in use.


Scales = protective pieces that a razor folds into. when folded into the scales, the blade is protected from accidental damage, and the user is protected from accidental injury. Handle scales are made of various materials, including mother-of-pearl, celluloid, bone, plastic and wood.

Strop = A razor strop is a flexible strip of leather or canvas used in sharpening a such as a straight razor. Unlike honing a blade, in which a whetstone removes metal bent out of alignment from the blade's edge, stropping the blade re-aligns the indentations without removing any material.

The strop may be a hanging strop or a hand-held paddle.

Tang = The upward curved metal end of the narrow part of the blade beyond the pivot is called the tang and acts as a lever to help raise the blade from the handle.
 

justin

Well-Known Member
I would be honored, Bart.

Pivot: The point at which the blade is connected to the scales (handle) with a pin. It's located between the tang and the the tail. Straight razor diagram.

Tail: The end of the blade that continues past the pivot and curves upwards. Used to flip the blade out of the scales, and also used to help stabilize the razor while shaving.

Shoulder: Found by the heel of the blade; it's the transition from the tang to the heel. Not all razors have a shoulder. Straight razor diagram.

If anybody thinks something should be changed/added in an existing definition feel free to speak up.
 

JimR

Well-Known Member
An excellent idea, and one I'll try to add to soon. But I think perhaps we should credit our sources? I'm seeing a lot of Copy & Paste of broken links...
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
JimR said:
An excellent idea, and one I'll try to add to soon. But I think perhaps we should credit our sources? I'm seeing a lot of Copy & Paste of broken links...
I'm sorry Jim, but I haven't got a clue what you're talking about. Could you elaborate?
 

pedalpowersailing

Well-Known Member
jim

this is just a start. It is my opinion that we (coticule.be) rewrite the list when we have put something together. This will then be unique to this forum

At this stage I for one was just brainstorming using avaliable material

If this is wrong please let me know
 

JimR

Well-Known Member
Bart, I'm assuming that when a text includes mysteriously underlined words, like Razor Diagram, it has been copied and pasted from another place (say,
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?) where there was a link there. However, the link was not copied, only the underlined text. Thus it looks like a lot of these are copied and pasted from other sources, with no attribution. Or are the links just broken right now? I't's not clear.

The only reason I bring it up is, I have had recent problems with people taking my words without attribution, and it's a crappy crappy feeling. Unless you write your own material, you should always note your source in some way. It's just polite. I'm not accusing anyone of anything, just saying that if I notice it, then I am probably not going to be the only one.
 

justin

Well-Known Member
I'm not the type of person to steal another persons work, let alone COPY & PASTE (that is the epitome of laziness :lol: ). I'm a scholar so I have respect for such things. Any similarities are merely coincidence.

These definitions are of my own creation, and I purposely underlined the words to signify where a link is to be placed.

Justin

Edit: I don't think the underline is copied over anyway.
 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
Oh don’t worry about it Jim, the links don’t go anywhere just yet… they’re just placeholders for photos or diagrams to be added later.
Sure, when the number of posts have grown the text and graphics will be copy and pasted into a full text to be added to the academy… (Wiki?)
 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
Hey don't forget this part that some will call the Toe, just because it’s at the other end of the Heel, the name is debatable. But whatever you want to call it… Round, Square, Spanish, French, or Notched (did I forget any?) you’ll get the Point.
 

justin

Well-Known Member
Smythe said:
Hey don't forget this part that some will call the Toe, just because it’s at the other end of the Heel, the name is debatable. But whatever you want to call it… Round, Square, Spanish, French, or Notched (did I forget any?) you’ll get the Point.

After running that through Google Translate I got this (not sure how accurate the translation):

Toe, Point: The tip of the razor, the end opposite of the heel. Toes comes in many different flavors. Round, Square, Spanish, French, or Notched. Pictures here
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
@ Jim: yes the undelined words are just meant to become future links in the finished article. We're not going to bother with working links in this thread: too much hassle. But your concern is genuine and I call upon all contributors to this thread to not copy and paste anything. We're creative enough to come up with original formulations.

@ all involved: Considereing Toe, Point, etc. Lets make them all a separate lemma, and cross reference them. The idea is that an inexperienced person can look up a word that he does not know. So he has has to be able to find "Toe" under T and "Point" under P. Same thing for Spanish, French, etc... I think each link in the CDR ("Coticule's Dictionary of Razor terms" - a preliminary working title) must eventually lead to a separate entry. Links to additional information outside the CDR, should be best summed at the end of each description.
These are just some random thoughts of mine. Feel free to disagree and discuss. We're inventing this from scratch, you're all invited to think along.

@ Justin: I'll contact you on e-mail when I have setup your access to the back end. Probably during the coming week.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Pins Rivets items used to hold razor scales (handles) in place and provide a pivot for the tang of the blade
Traditionally made of Brass, Nickel Silver, Steel, or Stainless steel, a washer is placed over the end of the Pin and the end is then peened to form a smooth bevel, ensuring the washer is held tight to the Scale in turn the opposite side is peened in the same manner, holding the scales tight against either the Tang at the pivot end or the wedge/spacer at the opposite end.
Peening or mushrooming the ends of Pins is considered by most to be a skilful craft, requiring experience and accuracy so as not to damage the Scales, yet hold the blade Pivot tight.
Recent years have seen a few Restorers and Manufactures using threaded micro fasteners in place of Pins these both facilitate a means of adjusting the tension of the Pivot and allow for easier assembly.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Some edits I'd like to suggest:

tat2Ralfy said:
Pins: also Rivets: items used to hold razor scales (handles) in place and provide a pivot for the blade. In case of a handle made of 2 separate scales, a second pin holds the rear end together. Occasionally, a third pin serves as a tang rest, near the shoulder of the razor. [needs a drawing]
Pins are traditionally made of Brass, Nickel Silver, Steel, or Stainless steel, a washers are placed over the end of the pin before they are peened.

Peening: Tapping the end of a pin with a ball peen hammer, in order to expand it. As a result the now mushroom shaped pin no longer slides trough the hole in the washer. This secures a tight fit and puts the connection under the required tension.
Recent years have seen a few Restorers and Manufactures using threaded micro fasteners in place of pins

Tension: force that pinches the tang in between both scale parts and keeps the blade from pivoting too loosely.

ball peen hammer: hammer with a rounded had, used for peening and for restoring proper tension on loose scales.

loose scales: condition where scales have lost their tight grip on the tang of the razor. Can usually be fixed with a ball peen hammer. In case the razor is assembled with screws instead of the more traditional pins, simple adjustment of the screw fixes the issue of loose scales.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Now thats a good edit Sir Bart
see what happens when I try to expand my usual half a sentence....lol
 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
Bearings (also called Thrust Bearings), a pair of thin brass disks used as bushings and placed between the scales and the blade, one each on either side of the tang.
Though some simply call them “washers” it may be confused with the so called “washers” placed on the mushroomed end of the pins, however those on the ends of the pin are also named Lock Washers.
 
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