Where and what to buy?

paulsen

Member
And oh, yes -- hello all from a new guy!

Looking at The Coticule Vault I see a number of different Coticules with various characteristics. So, the questions are:

1) What characteristics are desirable for someone not yet "schooled in the art"?
2) How/where do I buy a Coticule based on the desirable characteristics?

I have a Coticule I bought from Ardennes some time ago but have no idea what its characteristics are:

It is about 5.5cm x 10.5cm. My first use of it was not very successful, but that was pretty much my first try ever at any honing. I will be looking over the Academy here carefully!

Bob
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Hello and Welcome,

Before looking to invest in another Coticule I would use the one you have to gain practise and experience, it looks a fairly usable size, although a slightly longer stone may be easier, its not essential by any means.
If you have a (spare) razor in good shape and better yet shave ready, read and take it through the unicot method thats in the academy here, that should be enough to give you a good taste of whats involved and if you report your results in the coticule Tavern you should find more than enough help and feedback to help along the way.

So give it a go, let us know how you get on and good luck.
 

Paul

Well-Known Member
+1 to Dr. Ralphson. You appear to have a very nice stone and Unitcot is a very easy way to successfully use a Coticule. Welcome Bob!
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
+ another 1

10.5 is not long, but you'll get used to it. Unicot is the way to start, because it's easy to get good results. On your short hone, add 50% to all stroke counts.
If you post a picture where we can see the side of your hone better, a positive ID might be possible. It looks like a "Nouvelle Veine", I think I can see glimpses of faint and short blue lines at the side of the yellow part, that give it away.

At the first attempts, please follow the Unicot instructions to the letter. People tend to take shortcuts, e.g. with the pre-dulling stroke on glass, and then they wonder why it's not working as expected... Soon, when you have gained a feel for your Coticule, you'll develop your own style. Until then the shortest route to success is to copy proofed methods.

Welcome to Coticule.be,

Bart.
 

jfdupuis

Well-Known Member
Hey Bart,

just saw your reply there. Would you recommend I do twice the strokes as well on my 12.5 cm stone?

Thx!

JF
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
jfdupuis said:
Hey Bart,

just saw your reply there. Would you recommend I do twice the strokes as well on my 12.5 cm stone?

Thx!

JF
As a starting point, yes. But my numbers can't compete with how a Coticule owner learns to know his particular specimen, as he gains experience with it.

Best regards,
Bart.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
paulsen said:
Thanks all for the advice. :thumbup:

Here is an edge picture...
Hmm... What I though were faint blue lines, are in fact black manganese deposits. Manganese plays a key role in the formation of spessartine garnet crystals, the abrasive medium in Cocticules. Hones with some manganese left over, are densely packed with fine garnets. They almost always turn out to be fast and fine cutters.
Could still be a "La Nouvelle Veine", but without the blue lines, I can't be sure. Could be a "La Dressante" as well, with that faint pinkish hue shining trough. Your slurry stone looks like a "La Grosse Jaune", but that's just a hunch, based on color and that noisy pattern.

Best regards,
Bart.
 

paulsen

Member
Bart said:
paulsen said:
Thanks all for the advice. :thumbup:

Here is an edge picture...
Hmm... What I though were faint blue lines, are in fact black manganese deposits. Manganese plays a key role in the formation of spessartine garnet crystals, the abrasive medium in Cocticules. Hones with some manganese left over, are densely packed with fine garnets. They almost always turn out to be fast and fine cutters.
Could still be a "La Nouvelle Veine", but without the blue lines, I can't be sure. Could be a "La Dressante" as well, with that faint pinkish hue shining trough. Your slurry stone looks like a "La Grosse Jaune", but that's just a hunch, based on color and that noisy pattern.

Best regards,
Bart.
Thanks! Sounds encouraging.
 
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