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A new bout - pls help with id

BlueDun

Well-Known Member
Hi there,

I found this beautiful Tigerlilly in a local tool shop. It is a size 8 bout and it had my name on it :love:
There are purple and pale yellow veins running diagonally through most part of the stone.
I just tried a dilucot and it was fairly easy and straight forward. It is quite quick with slurry turning the slurry dark almost instantly. There's that faint abrasion feeling. It slows down a bit with water but the slightes hint of slury makes it cut again much faster. The stone is quite hard and the thinner the slurry gets the more the feedback turns into a glass-like sensation. I reached a HHT3 right off the stone and after stropping I'd give it a very solid 4.

I'm not quite sure about the layer but I'd say it is either a La Dressante or a La Grosse Blanche.
What speaks for La Dressante are those purple and yellow tiger stripes that resemble specimens like N°57 or N°39 from the vault. Also the honing feedback is quite similar to N°57 only the tiger lines are much less noticeable and audible.

Yet, there is one thing that seems to be commonly seen in La Grosse Blanches: Photo oxidation. I lapped the hone but those tiger stripes were brown before that - both the purple and the pale yellow ones. This can still be seen in the last side shot. In the left part of the picture the hone surface is yellow. But the side shows the continuation of those yellow stripes, only that they are brown because I did not touch them.
Oh, and one funning thing that I did not encounter before: Once slurry is raised the thing starts to spread a strange smell. A bit like rotten fish mixed with petroleum. :blink: :blink:

May I ask Sir Bart to shed some light on that thing - including that smell ;)

Cheers
BlueDun

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TM280

Well-Known Member
Ah, yes the infamous La Grosse Gross, easily identified by its putrid aroma...:D

regards,
Torolf


I don't think I'd pass on this one if I stumbled onto it either...stunning stone. What's the length the long side?
 

BlueDun

Well-Known Member
Torolf, my friend! I should have thought of you in the first place. Living in Norway you surely are well educated about all the smells the big sea provides. From fresh crab over rotten halibut to a gross La Grosse :lol: :lol: So, your piece smells too, hu? I already was concerned that "strange" things have happened in the dark past of that piece of rock :blush:
Sizewise that little beauty was a positive surprise for me. Although the maximum dimensions are "only" 115x63 mm I found honing that ol' Engels today a real breeze. This lil' lady made it straight to my favorite hones ...

Cheers
BlueDun
 

BlacknTan

Well-Known Member
I've been reading a lot about the smell of the coticule, and I've been tryinmg to smell mine. Wet, dry, with slurry or without, nothing registers. Folks on my Mother's side are known for a poor sense of smell, and I might have inherited that, but I just get nothing...
Possibly when my new bout arrives that Sir Bart chose for me... I'd like to see what the coticule scent actually is!

BTW, BlueDun..

That's a beautiful stone, and I wish you use it in good health!
 

deighaingeal

Well-Known Member
That is simply gorgeous. I wish I knew enough to tell you what you want to know, but my uncles stones all smell like what you describe and they all have been used on his long-liner. Speaking of which I think I need to go make a fish order to Alaska.:)
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
That's a La Dressante. No Doubt.

La Grosse Blanche is pale and creamy when not oxidized, with sometimes a few light brown lines that can't be felt. But those kind of red lines are often seen in La Dressante. The funny thing is that n°39 was a rather slow specimen, but I already predicted that it would become fast once those red lines were exposed. It seems even possible that they add a (non-garnet based) abrasion to the hone. Can you confirm that this Coticule is fast on water?

It is definitely not a La Grosse Jaune. That layer has a wood grain pattern, a lot like La Grise, but more yellow that turns ochre hen wet.

Kind regards,
Bart
 

BlueDun

Well-Known Member
I thank thee, your royal Coticuleness, for that enlightenment ;)

So a La Dressante again. It really seems that there is some strange, yet cearly obvious attraction between me and this Layer. Out of the 6 Coticules I own, 4 are La Dressantes.
There is my
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which I found together with a La Verte in an old knife shop. Then came
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I picked during the coticule pilgrimage. After that the
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from the vault arrived and now its that nice Tigerlilly.

I should be quite bored with so many hones from the same layer but I am actually everything else than that. I am highly fascinated about the big differences they exhibit. If I would not have Identification by Maurice and Bart I would assign them to different layers right away. Talk about classification of layers ... with these four pieces I have the clear evidence that such an endeavor would be futile - at least for La Dressante.
They do show some general similarities if for example compared to my La Verte. But they also show some clear differences when it comes to details. They all give a similar feedback with slurry. A fine sensation of abrasion and a fine hissing sound. They are all on the faster side. From a moderately fast with N°57 to a very fast with the longish bout from Ardennes. But here the similarities stop.

Looking at the coloration they already fall into two different families. The pale yellow background with tiger stripes on N°57 and Tigerlilly on one hand and the more beige background with blush areas on the other two.
Honing on water is also different. N°57 and Tigerlilly turn to a glass-like feedback on water. On the other two that abrasive feedback will fade but never completely disappear. They also feel "softer" while honing.

The speed on water exhibits another significant spread. Bart, you may not believe it but N°57 is actually the slowest here. I must therefore object to your rating it as fast on water. The champion in this discipline is the bout from Ardennes. With the very first stroke the water will turn grey on this one. Then comes the benchstone with the concrete backing. Four to five strokes and the metal shaves will show. In analogy to the coloration the two other ones separate here. On Tigerlilly I need about 15-20 strokes to arrive at the same water discoloration while on N°57 I'm barely close even after 30 strokes.

The more I get into these rocks the more they confuse and fascinate. So similar and yet so different. I guess I'll have to strike a deal with Maurice. I'll commit as serf for two weeks and in exchange I may sleep at the shop and try every hone I find :rolleyes: . If I hadn't go back to work soon I'd actually seriously think about that ...
But I guess I do have enough practicing objects at home right now. And once I'm through with them the Les Petites Blanches may come, and then the Les Veinettes, and then the Les Latneueses , and then .... :) :rolleyes: :)

And for the moment I am happy to own the only La Dressante that exhibits photo oxidation and stinks like a baboon butt.

Cheers
BlueDun
 
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