Clogged canvas restoration.

maro

Well-Known Member
As mentioned in
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, here I continue with an update on the condition of canvas side of the strop.
The pictures of the canvas side clogged with TI paste
Jemico%20strop%20before.jpg
after attempts od scrapping it off
Jemico%20strop%20middle.jpg
and finally after squeezing it out with a rounded metal spatula.
Jemico%20strop%20after.jpg
Scrubbing it off with a rag is still ahead of me (there are still some residues between fibres left), but the strop seems to be in a workable condition already now.
As a last resort I'll flip it over to the other side if needed.
 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
If the TI stuff is oily or waxy, you could wash it in kerosene. That will dissolve the oil carrying the abrasive. Roll up the canvas so it will fit into a glass jar and pour the kero in the jar, seal the jar so it wont vaporize and leave it in there for a few hours, give the jar a stir every now and again and soon you should see stiff settle at the bottom of the jar.
Take it our and squeeze dry, replace with fresh kero and repeat. When you are satisfied the strop is as clean as possible allow it to completely dry then drop the thing in the washing machine with hot water… but don’t put it in the dryer as the heat may not be good for the material… instead allow it to dry on its own.

In the old days they would “charge” or “break-in” new canvas by rubbing ordinary bar soap on the surface and pressing with a glass bottle to get the soap into the grain, then rub off the excess.
 

maro

Well-Known Member
Smythe said:
If the TI stuff is oily or waxy, you could wash it in kerosene. That will dissolve the oil carrying the abrasive. Roll up the canvas so it will fit into a glass jar and pour the kero in the jar, seal the jar so it wont vaporize and leave it in there for a few hours, give the jar a stir every now and again and soon you should see stiff settle at the bottom of the jar.
Thanks Smythe! :thumbup: I have no idea what TI stuff is made of so I'll try to dissolve a bit nipped off the baton first. If it works then I'll make a try with a strop.
Smythe said:
... then drop the thing in the washing machine with hot water… but don’t put it in the dryer as the heat may not be good for the material… instead allow it to dry on its own.
This may be quite a challenge as the strop has a Russian leather inseparably attached. :D
I'd need to unpick the seams to wash the canvas. But if I went so far, I could easily flip canvas to the brand new inner side and sew it back together with the leather.
Smythe said:
In the old days they would “charge” or “break-in” new canvas by rubbing ordinary bar soap on the surface and pressing with a glass bottle to get the soap into the grain, then rub off the excess.
That's exatly what an old barber was telling me some time ago, but I didn't understand the purpose of such treatment. :huh:
 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
Oh… well now I would defiantly separate the strop from the canvas, you don’t want any of that abrasive stuff to get on the leather while washing with kero or water… it would be impossible to prevent that without separating the strops. When done with washing you can always stitch them back together with fresh thread following the original hole-pattern and you would never know it was ever opened.

If your jar is big enough you could you could leave the strops attached place the canvas side inside the jar and leave the leather hanging outside the opened jar… not the best solution but it’s quick.

I have been reading some old books about strop treatment and quite often soap is recommend as a treatment for canvas, and I believe in one old text it was recommended for leather as well… I will post links if I can find in my bookmarks.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
All good suggestions, but if that's a Dovo (Jemico) strop, the canvas and leather or both stitched to the same pieces of leather at both ends.
I have described a cleaning method in my
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, that's certainly worth the effort of trying.

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

maro

Well-Known Member
It is Dovo Jemico indeed. It looks exactly like this:
j33wa.jpg
I've red Bart's article about stropping and "Scrubbing it off with a rag is still ahead of me" referred directly to it.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
maro said:
I've red Bart's article about stropping and "Scrubbing it off with a rag is still ahead of me" referred directly to it.
Scrubbing with a brush and soap is what it says in the article.
Wiping with a rag that's changed to a clean spot very frequently is advice posted in another thread, to get rid of as much paste as possible. A point you have arrived at already. Now it's scrubbing-with-a-brush time. Just felt like rubbing that in.::lol: :lol:

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Bart said:
Just felt like rubbing that in
"Rubbing it in" bwhahahaha your one funny guy Sir Bart!! hahaha

TBH its easy and effective, a roll of clingfilm, paper towels, stiff brush, shave soap, and a good vacuum in the morning, its well worth it :thumbup:
 

maro

Well-Known Member
Bart said:
Scrubbing with a brush and soap is what it says in the article.
Wiping with a rag that's changed to a clean spot very frequently is advice posted in another thread, to get rid of as much paste as possible. A point you have arrived at already. Now it's scrubbing-with-a-brush time. Just felt like rubbing that in.::lol: :lol:
Oops... :blush: Fortunately I got sick and wasn't able to complete the exercise yet. And, apparently, reading with understanding is also something I need to practice. :D
 

maro

Well-Known Member
To finish the thread, here is the picture with the final result of the cleaning process.
DSCN1697.jpg
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
maro said:
Much better, I would say. :D
That's excellent news.

If you want to fully restore the original performance, you need to buy a small tube of DOVO white linen dressing. (It's most likely a suspension of chalk and soap). The linen will work without it. The end results are the same, but with the white stuff on it it can handle slight dullness a bit better, or a fresh honing job that stayed ever so slightly below par.

I should write a review of the stuff when I find the time...

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Works for me.
I used it all the time until I did the wash as you have with Barts amazing brush and soap method, since then I have been toying with using it again, and now I believe I will, right before tomorrows morning shave :thumbup:

Best wishes
Your Dovo white strop paste loving friend
Ralfson (Dr)
 

maro

Well-Known Member
Bart said:
If you want to fully restore the original performance, you need to buy a small tube of DOVO white linen dressing. (It's most likely a suspension of chalk and soap). The linen will work without it. The end results are the same, but with the white stuff on it it can handle slight dullness a bit better, or a fresh honing job that stayed ever so slightly below par.
Thanks for the advice. I'll search for the Dovo white dressing when I have more time and gather more items to be purchased. Buying this stuff only seems to make no sense as shipment costs would probably double the price. :)
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
If I can find the time, I plan on trying something with a grated blackboard crayon, soap and water.
I have enough straps to try it out without risking a good strop.
I think it should work just the same. If it does, I'll let you know.

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

maro

Well-Known Member
Thanks a lot. Crayon, soap and water are ingredients easily attainable in Poland. Especially water. We've got plenty of it nowadays. ;)
 
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