GEM Cutlery Company , Brooklyn NY

Snuff

Well-Known Member
Ah such sweet shavers, not that I want to lure you into anything but just in case ...... :D

History of SE razors:

1911-1912 Gem de Luxe

1912 Gem "Damaskeene" - the "Damaskeene"

1919 Gem "1912" - what we'd call the "1912"

1930 Gem Micromatic "Open Comb"

1940s? Gem "1912 Junior"

1941 Gem Micromatic "Clog Pruf"

1947 Gem "Flying Wing"



... thereafter, we get the Featherlight, Pushbutton, G-Bar & Contour/II models.



Unlike Gem, prior to the 1930s, Ever Ready did not use the "1912" style head. Their initial offerings were the Lather Catcher basket head on an a short sylindrical handle, then on the ASR style long handle. They were the "American Safety Razor Company" until "Ever Ready" was trademarked in 1923, so although I use the abbreviation "ER" below, they're not "Ever Ready" until 1923.



1911-1912 ER - lather catcher style/cylindrical handle

1912-1914 ER - lather catcher style head/ASR-style long handle

1914-1915 ER "1914" Marked "American Safety Razor Company New York" Patent Pending

1917-1919 ER "1914" Marked "Ever Ready" Patented March 24/14

1918 "Radio" Blade - just a point of interest being perhaps "Radio" predated "Ever Ready" on the razors that are marked "Radio"?

1919 ER Hinged Cap "Brooklyn New York USA" Patent Applied For

1923 "Ever Ready" trademarked

1925 ER "1914" & "1924" produced hereafter marked "Ever Ready"

1930 The Improved Ever Ready ("1912") - what we call the "1912" finally coming into common production (see above, regarding "Radio")

1930s "Star" - supercedes "Ever Ready" and duplicates "Gem" ("1912")

1933-1934 E-Bar - potentially earlier than the Gem offering of the same model?



... thereafter (1950s) Streamline, Featherlight, etc



So, when we intermingle the company timelines, we see than what we call the 1912 was the Damaskeene from 1912, the GEM from 1919, Ever Ready joining the show in 1930 and seceding to Star during that decade.



The 1914 was an ASR to being with, becoming Ever Ready after 1923 along with a new model, which we call the 1924 although that hinged cap had been in production since 1919. Therefore, we can see the pre-1924 "1924" as a rival to the GEM "1912" released in 1919.



Likewise, once the GEM Micromatics came to the field in 1930, Ever Ready picked up the old line "1912" while still being produced by Gem.



Putting it all together ...



1912 Gem Damaskeene (the "1912")

1914-1915 (ER) "1914" Marked "American Safety Razor Company New York" Patent Pending

1917-1919 (ER) "1914" Marked "Ever Ready" Patented March 24/14

1918 "Radio" trademark blade - just a point of interest being perhaps "Radio" predated "Ever Ready" on the razors that are marked "Radio"?

1919 Star became a subsiduary of ASR

1919 Gem "1912"

1919 (ER) Front Hinged Cap "Brooklyn New York USA" Patent Applied For (becomes the "1924")

1923 "Ever Ready" trademarked by ASR

1924 "GEM" trademark redesigned by ASR

1925 ER "1914" & "1924" produced hereafter marked "Ever Ready"

1930 Gem "Micromatic" (the Open Comb)

1930 The Improved Ever Ready ("1912") - what we call the Ever Ready "1912" finally coming into common production (see above, regarding "Radio")

1933 ER "E-Bar" - potentially earlier than the Gem offering of the same model? (Last use of "Ever Ready" in the US)

1930s "Star" - supercedes "Ever Ready" in the US (British market continues with "Every Ready") and duplicates "Gem" ("1912") ... perhaps simply becoming the "Junior"

1930s? Gem G-Bar (introduced after the cessation of the Ever Ready trademark in the US)

1940s? Gem "1912 Junior"

1941 Gem (Micromatic) "Clog Pruf"

1947 Gem (Micromatic) "Flying Wing"

1940s? (Late) ER "Streamline" (British - Ever Ready trademark picked up in Britain ... last used in US in 1933)

1950s ER Featherweight (British)

1950s Gem Featherweight/Pushbutton

1960s Gem Contour

1970s Gem Contour II



So, the Gem "1912" is only a 1912 if it's a Damaskeene, 1919 otherwise. An Ever Ready "1912" is actually a 1930 and Star "1912" were made from 1933. Radio "1912" continues to elude us.



Ever Ready "1914" is a 1914 if "patent pending", 1917-1919 otherwise.



Ever Ready "1924" is a not a 1924 if "patent applied for" which makes it actually a 1919.



Pivotal years seem to be 1912 (Gem Damaskeene "1912" begins), 1919 (Star brought into ASR, Gem "1912" begins & Ever Ready "1924" comes into pre-patent production), 1923 (Ever Ready brand goes full blown) and 1930 (Ever Ready "1912" begins).



The last Damaskeenes made after the 1919 merger are marked Gem Safety Razor, instead of Gem Cutlery and some have a bevelled edge on the cover plate.



Stoll Chrome Steel Single Edge Safety Razor. Wilbert Cutlery Co., Chicago, Illinois. Probably manufactured by Kampfe Bros., Brooklyn, NY. Stoll and Wilbert S C S razors were offered by Sears, Roebuck circa 1914-1926 and were similar to the Kampfe Star, Gem and Ever-Ready models

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Hellas

Undercover Moderator
SU-Patron
:verwarnung1:verwarnung1:verwarnung1

Don't shave with that razor! If you do, yo will then be looking for a 1912, 1914, 1924, and Damaskeene. After that, there are the ones that uses wedge blades.
too late. Tried it today.

Ah such sweet shavers, not that I want to lure you into anything but just in case ...... :D
that looks much to complicate and to much for me. However, the first shave was quite mild, although not the closest one. I think that’s the total different handling and angle than DE-Razor. Anyway I don’t think that it will make make straights obsolet
 

Hellas

Undercover Moderator
SU-Patron
You need to shave with the cap nearly parallel to the face. It wil make a terrific sound, and deliver a close shave.
done, and you are totally right. It’s not „riding the cap“, but sliding the cap. Indeed great sound and close and comfortable shave. Although the „five o‘clock shadow“ comes earlier than with most of my other razors. But as I’m in Homeoffice now. Who cares. Fine enough for staying home:D
 
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