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Handmade #2

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
I did it again, slightly longer in tang and tail than my first, and with a pronounced smile :)

This time I have used O1 tool steel for the blade, and I made the scales from black Perspex, white Polycarb wedge, with handmade washers and pins holding it all together.

I have started to form the bevel, and hopefully my attempts at heat treating will prove fruitful once I complete the honing, many thanks for looking Chaps, and as always your comments make my day.

Best regards
Ralfson (Dr)

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Deckard

Well-Known Member
Very,very,good job.
Excellent workmanship:thumbup:
How have you fixed the blade into the frame?
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Many thanks :)

I used a loctite product, thats no longer commercially available I believe, it is designed to bond engine bearings into worn casings, best stuff I ever used, I have used it as a stud lock, and sheered the bolt trying to undo it ;)

Best regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 

Deckard

Well-Known Member
As a matter of interest, how did you heat treat the blade?
Some say O1 likes a little soak time but I'm not so sure for such thin sections.
 

Loric

Active Member
Thats one damn fine looking razor! I love the file work on the jibbs and spine. Its aggressive and modern with out being over the top, very well done!
 

clovis

Well-Known Member
Perhaps an odd subject for a first post but..... given the loctite product isn't available anymore, would something like belzona, or thistlebond work? There are used industrially for fixing various things including bearing housings, crank cases, pump impellers & volutes etc. They've proven to be very durable and long lasting as lo ng as the application and curing process is properly done. Fantastic work by the way, you must have a real sense of satisfaction from the results of your work.
 

Deckard

Well-Known Member
I've used epoxy resin on my rasor, it worked fine though the steel needed a slight key.
Other custom makers are known to solder the blade into the frame, I'm not confident about the heat.
 

Emmanuel

Well-Known Member
For my opinion the correct way to fix the blade in the spine is as follows:
1)Exactly equal slot width and upper blade thickness. The blade in dry ice or deep frozen ,contrary the spine should be tempered until 150 Celsius or 302 F.
2) The slot a liitle beat larger and just you have to solder by tin.
Best regards
Emmanuel
 

danjared

Well-Known Member
Deckard said:
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Can the blade be welded to the frame, then the entire razor be heat treated? I imagine the different compositions of the two steels should not matter (assuming the frame is made of steel).
 

Toff

Well-Known Member
Ralfy, You do do nice work! I like the little notch in the frame at the heel of the blade..cues to Mapin and Webb. The jimps are purrfect!
I hope she shaves as nicely as she's looking.
Respectfully
~Richard
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Beautiful work, my friend. I have been staring at you file work on the tang. It's not only of classical beauty, but unique and makes your work stand out from all others. :thumbup:
I had expected you to come up with this level of aesthetic mastery after 5 or 6 attempts, but not so soon. If it shaves as well as it looks, you have achieved an amazing result.

Well done,
Bart.
 
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