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How to bring back to life rusted fittings of an old strop?

vgeorge

Well-Known Member
I pulled out the fittings from an old strop - really cute, but rusted iron. Hints of old plating are still there in patches.

I thought plain cleaning, brushing with a wire brush, PLUS some mineral oil will do the trick. After doing those, on closer examination, it is clear that those are not sufficient. It is still staining things.

I will buff out most of the rust next.

What would you suggest I do after that (something less complicated) to seal the surface? Remember also, I cannot access all of the surfaces for buffing!

Thanks, guys!
 

BlacknTan

Well-Known Member
For any treatment to be effective and long lasting, all traces of the oxidation must go!

I would recommend glass beading, (like sandblasting, but done in a cabinet with ultra fine glass media)followed by copper/nickel/ chrome plating. The pieces would then outlive my good self..

A good metalworking shop should be able to help... Hell, I used to do this kind of stuff for folks, gratis. Or on rare occasion, a six pack of Heineken for a big job..
 

vgeorge

Well-Known Member
Thanks, regarding Hammerite, Bart.

BlacknTan said:
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BlacknTan, thank you, I would have gladly come anywhere within reason with the Heineken 6-pack or a bottle of Highland Park 18 years.

It is a pity that we are spread all around the world.
 

Emmanuel

Well-Known Member
vgeorge
I restored my gfather strop.The fittings was rusted too.I pull them carefully and i gave them to a chromiumplate shop close of my house.I took them chromiumplated as brand new.For that i paid six euros.Isnt more easy?.
Best regards
Emmanuel
 

vgeorge

Well-Known Member
Thanks, Emmanuel.

If the price is within reason, electroplating is what I will do. Sometimes in the US what is inexpensive elsewhere in the world can be very expensive and vice versa. Ready-made clothes, for example, is quite inexpensive in the US. I do not know how expensive will be electroplating. I have identified an electroplating company nearby.

If that does not work out, I will go the direction suggested by Bart. We don't have Hammerite in the US, though. I read about it, and tried to find out what is available in the US. I identified a brand called Rust-Oleum that will do the same thing (seal over rust).

Thanks for your help.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
BlacknTan said:
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That is incorrect. While it would do no harm to remove all rust, the product I linked to converts and fixates the rust into a different kind of oxidation, that protects the metal from further corrosion. It paints it at the same time and is available in a couple of different metallic colors.

Of course, loose rust needs to be brushed away first and the surface of the painted objects remains somewhat textured, which can be a desirable effect or not. But it is definitely a valid option to treat metal with a sturdy coating without the need to completely remove all corrosion. I don't know about the US, but Hammerite is easily available in Belgium. I suspect there are other brands as well.

There are several other old-schools rust convertors, that would probably do a good job as well, yet these do not offer a nicely painted surface finish.
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Kind regards,
Bart
 

BlacknTan

Well-Known Member
Please notice that I added "long lasting," Bart.

I have tried the rust converters you mention, and been disappointed in their long term performance. Once oxidation of ferrous metals starts, one needs to get under it to stop the process, and when I do a repair, I like it to be a lasting repair.
Many coatings claim to be rust preventive, but over time oxidation can work it's evil magic from underneath the coating. Many coatings are also porous to moisture themselves.
There are steels the corrode and form a resistant oxide. They still corrode, but at a much slower pace.

But, we're each entitled to our own opinion..
 
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