Huveso 65

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Here is my latest attempt, a vintage Huveso 65 in Spalted Beech, Perspex Wedge, Handmade Washers and Pins, All work as usual by my good self.
Just finished Honing the little blighter, test shave in the morning, thank you for looking.

Best Regards
Ralfson (Dr)

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Huvesowedge.jpg
 

Stewart

Active Member
Very nice! Ralfson.
I am quite fond of beech and your home made washers look very nice. Anyone would be proud and delighted to shave and own that razor.
Really nice work. :thumbup:

Stew
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
Ralfy,
Those look pretty good my friend!!!!

I have a question about the spalted wood. Spalting in wood is an active fungus and stays active in areas where humidity is above 12%, so I guess England qualifies. Did you kill the fungus before you sealed the wood?

Ray
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
Ralfy,
You more than likely don't have anything to worry about. Until recently, white shellack was used to seal the wood as one way of stopping the fungus from growing. Another was to put the wood into a kiln and dry it out, bring the humidity of the wood down, and hat would kill the bacteria.

Today, CA is a widely acceptable method of accomplishing the same thing. Although you didn't CA the inside of your scales, let's hope that the fungus was already inactive to begin with and this is just something to remember the next time you use spalted woods.

Great job on the scales by the way.

Ray
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Sure thing Ray, I did CA the inside of the scales so I think that the dreaded lung rot should stay at bay for a good while :thumbup:

Gentlemen thank you for your kind words of praise

Best regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Here's my earlier reply that got lost during today's server exchange:
That's mighty nice work, Ralfson.

I wouldn't worry about the fungus too much. Those 12% humidity is about the humidity of the wood. It's not the same as relative humidity of the air. The wood was dry, , the fungus dormant. You've sealed it with CA. The wood will stay dry, the fungus remains dormant.
If you want to know more about the relation between air humidity and moisture content in wood:
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I really like the finish you've put on that razor. It's very smooth, with just a minor fog. I like that much more than the glass-like mirror I see often on restores. It's a personal preference, of course.

:thumbup:
Bart.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Bart said:
I really like the finish you've put on that razor. It's very smooth, with just a minor fog. I like that much more than the glass-like mirror I see often on restores. It's a personal preference, of course.

:thumbup:
Bart.
Thank you my friend, the thing I did different this time was to wax the whole thing 3 times before I took the photo's the wax does give the scales a nice luster :thumbup:

Best regards
Ralfson (Dr)

P.S oh yeah one last thing:

Spalted Beech. now that wood is hard as iron!!
 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
Fabulous, love the blade work... nice polish and that wood finish is a peach.

However I would think they treat or process the raw wood before it goes to market... do they?

Again, excellent work man.:thumbup:
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Very nice thing, although I find this a little too skinny - yet, in my opinion, even further narrowing the pivot end would help to get a more nicely balanced look, now the edges run a tad too parallel for my taste. Unless it is just a shooting angle?

kind regards,
Matt
 

torbenbp

Well-Known Member
ohhhh Matt .You`re such a perfectionist;)

Can hardly wait to see you`re rescale job in wenge:p Wich you should have today or tommorow..

Friendly regards
Torben (the inperfect restorer by nature)
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Oh bollocks! Indeed, I am... :sleep:

After, all, I thought it's about honestly admitting what you think rather than patting each others' back... :) I see I've been challenged! :lol: Actually, the 1[sup]st[/sup] thing I'll attempt will be some local cherry wood I have been promised, I won't risk it with such precious stuff :)

regards,
Matt

PS. As for the delivery, I wouldn't be that sure about the time. Maybe I'm just awfully unlucky, but it's been 3 weeks since Gary had sent me the strop and it's still not here, let's pray it's all about the volcano and it find its way to me eventually.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
matis said:
After, all, I thought it's about honestly admitting what you think rather than patting each others' back... :)
Absolutely :thumbup:
And TBH your right too, however I like it the way it is so there! hahaha

Looking forward to seeing yours ;)

Best wishes
Ralfson (Dr)
 

torbenbp

Well-Known Member
Matt..You are absolutely right..and you`re inputs are much appriciated.
Sure hope you did`nt missunderstand my intentions;)
As for the cherry...that is actually some very nice wood to work with, and goodlooking too so that should be some nice scales...and perfect bwahahah:lol:

Have a nice one
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
torbenbp said:
Sure hope you did`nt missunderstand my intentions ;)
Sure I didn't mate :)

torbenbp said:
As for the cherry...that is actually some very nice wood to work with, and goodlooking too so that should be some nice scales...and perfect bwahahah:lol:
So do I hope! I have enough blades to cut myself if otherwise. :lol: :lol: :lol:

BTW, as I'm a total newbie to any woodworking (also, haven't seen the wood block yet) - what would you suggest for finishing this wood? Shellac that Ray mentioned sounds really interesting to me, but it has its own, brown colour, maybe it'd be an unsuitable selection in this case?

kind regards,
Matt
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
I am a newcomer too, this is my grand total of 2 sets of scales, and I too have some shellac, Mmm I was thinking of using it to grain fill the wenge? any idea if its good for that??
 

torbenbp

Well-Known Member
Hav`nt tried the beetle juice yet. Just finished a set of scales in cherry with a wenge wedge and the wenge turned almost yellow/black after applying CA...

How about trying shellac on a very small area of the wenge and see how it turns out?
Perhaps the shellac should be thinned with...erhhh...something...to easier sink into the wood..as far as I remember it dries very fast and thus wont get deep enough into the grain..
And it will need sanding between layers..

regards
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Shellac is dissolved in alcohol. I read that it can be used as grain filler too, I even saw a product called shellac sanding sealer, which was in form of powder - I don't know in what way it differs from ordinary shellac. I also read that you can use regular shellac as grain filler simply by making it more dense, i.e. putting more shellac into the mixture with alcohol. For finishing it's best (as often with other finishes) to apply many thin coats rather than less and thicker.

Hopefully Ray will chime in with his priceless knowledge?

kind regards,
Matt
 

torbenbp

Well-Known Member
Shellac is dissolved in alcohol
Hmmm will a cheap whisky work...it would sure smell nice ;-)

But as you say: Its about loads of thin layers and sanding in between layers. Did it on a guitar ..well a part of it...and the wood got a beautyful deep glow..but it took many layers to achieve that result.
regards
 
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