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I thought this was a La Dressante, but........

yohannrjm

Well-Known Member
.......then I looked at my Les Latneuses slurry stone. :confused:

I was pretty sure this combo bout I have was a La Dressante. It's pretty hard, but velvety smooth when honing, and also nice and quick.

The other day I was working up a slurry with my Les Latneuses slurry stone (obvious coti/'hybrid' combo), and noticed some pink streaks on the stone, and they matched up well with the bout. So I looked a little closer and couldn't tell the two apart.

The coti layers were almost perfect matches. There are also greyish streaks on the side view of the stones. Of course, one is a natural coti/BBW combo and the other has the coti/'hybrid' mix. I noticed a thread here by Bart saying that not all Les Latneuses combos are coti/'hybrid' combos, and that there may be coti/BBW Les Latneuses combos.

So that's when my 95% sure identification of the bout as La Dressante changed to about 70% sure......still La Dressante, but perhaps not.

Either way, it's an excellent hone. It puts a very fine shaving edge on a razor, and is pretty quick. However, all my cotis put a very fine edge on a razor (with proper technique), so that's not saying much. :lol:

What do you guys think?

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BlueDun

Well-Known Member
AFAIK La Dressante natural combos are pretty rare.
Les Latneuses do not come with blue layers attached. Their typical feature is the hybrid layer.
And looking at the side shots with the blue lines I'd actually go for a La Petite Blanche ..

Everthying highly speculative based on a more than modest knowledge base ... :rolleyes:

Cheers
BlueDun
 

danjared

Well-Known Member
It's possible, I don't know. Maybe Torolf or Stijn (or Bart, of course) have some input.
 

DJKELLY

Well-Known Member
I have been studying layers so the kid won't outshine me I'm sure it's either a Swaty or Carborundum.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
If you see small blue lines running parallel in the side of the Coticule, you're most likely looking at a La Nouvelle Veine.

There are stones with a hybrid backing that have these blue lines as well. Either part of La Nouvelle Veine is attached to a hybrid rock, or the other side of Les Latneuses has these blue lines too. I don't think anyone knows. Maurice said that weird things were going on at the bottom curve of the deposit. He told me that some of the layers seem to be fusing at that depth. This morning I tested a very strange Coticule for the next Vault, unlike anything I ever saw or tried. Maurice said it was physically present in the La Veinette layer, but it looks and behaves completely different.
All my careful mapping of the past years is falling apart.:cry: :D

Kind regards,
Bart
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
:D :D :D :D

The jury is still debating, fellows.
For all it's worth, it could be La Veine aux Poissons....

Maurice of. course would like to sell it as La Veinette.:sneaky:

I honed a Puma on it today. I received it with the edge resembling a very fine hacksaw. This was seen with the naked eye. I decided to deal with it entirely on the Coticule, where I would normally use a DMT-600 grit for that kind of damage repair. It took me an half hour of labor on slurry to restore a serviceable bevel. I'd say the specimen is fast, but not as fast as a typical La Veinette. Dilucot was quick and easy. The shave was engaging, bordering on mellow. What I woulda typically expect of a Puma. They're very nice shavers.

All I can say for now. I didn't make pictures yet. It is a combo with a BBW side, but Ardennes had the same Coticule slices with a hybrid back as well. I should check the hones I brought home from my last visit, there could be one among them.

Best regards,
Bart
 

danjared

Well-Known Member
Bart said:
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That's exciting. But I thought La Veine aux Poissons was six layers away from La Veinette (formerly Jolie-Veinette as you said in another thread) and thought to be mined out ages ago. How would it end up in the spot where La Veinette is without crossing through many layers?
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
I was merely joking there.;)

But. Let's look at that sketch by André Dumont (I discovered his first name, and yes he is a well know geologist from the 19th century). There's a band of layers of all numbers running diagonally deeper to the left. Ardennes has expanded the quarry to that same left side. If you were to print that drawing on a little note of 2 by 2 inch (5cmx5cm), and we stick that note on the upper right corner of a typical size of copier paper, the current quarry would occupy the whole paper. Ardennes is now mining at the bottom of the paper. On top of what was once the hill, there were several mining pits, that ran to a depth of 30 meter. They have long been quarrying at partially mined area. Coticule wasn't discovered a few years ago. There are no virgin deposits. But at the current depth, and if we estimate a trajectory for the layers we see on Dumont's drawing, it doesn't seem impossible to me that some of these other layers are turning up. Maurice has never mined them. I'm not sure if Joseph Grogna ever did. Prosper Burton surely has, but he's not among the living. Who will be able to recognize them? There ought to be some old notes by Burton. Maurice spoke of them, but I haven't been digging in Ardennes archive yet. Grogna regularly visits Ardennes. I met him briefly during my last visit, but he had urgent other matters, so there was no time to talk much. We did however both realize that we need to get together some time. Joseph Grogna is as bewitched by these rocks as I am.

Kind regards,
Bart
 

Emmanuel

Well-Known Member
Bart a question please. Is La Dressante a name civen from the old days or is new.
i know that La Dressante means align and if given by Maurise ,is for which reason.
thanks a lot.
Emmanuel
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
La Dressante is the name of one of the Coticule layers. These are all very old names, given to the layers more and a century ago, possibly more then 2 centuries ago.
The name was likely coined at another mining location, where it was the first layer they could mine.

I hope that answers your question, because I don't really grasp what you mean.

Kind regards,
Bart
 

yohannrjm

Well-Known Member
So it seems that this was a lot harder to identify than I thought it was going to be. :rolleyes:

Thanks for your help, everyone.

Regardless of identification, this hone is a pleasure to work with. It does put a pretty crisp edge on a blade. It seems to be rather fast on just water (to answer your question, Jared).

I was going to sell this one, in order to cut down on the collection, but changed my mind as I like its performance.

Yohann
 
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