Is this a Coticule?

Andreas63

Well-Known Member
Hi!
I found this hone at the local e-shop here in Sweden...is this a coticule? It smells like my "la verte" and after lapping it feels very smooth...

Thank you in advance :)

Andreas





http://www.bildplats.se/image/view/1416
http://www.bildplats.se/image/view/1417
http://www.bildplats.se/image/view/1418
http://www.bildplats.se/image/view/1419

PS= Bart can you please help me making the pictures show in the post:)
 

danjared

Well-Known Member
I've never seen one in person and am not intimately familiar with them, but given the shape and appearance of this one, it looks like it's probably a Jasper hone.
 

Andreas63

Well-Known Member
danjared said:
I've never seen one in person and am not intimately familiar with them, but given the shape and appearance of this one, it looks like it's probably a Jasper hone.
Thanks!:)
It's very hard and a little bit smoother than my coti.
To create slurry, which is grey, I have to use Norton 320grit wetpaper...no slurry with my bout...:blink:

If it's a Jasper: is this a razor hone?
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Andreas63 said:
...it certainly looks like a scythe...is it suitable for straight razors? :confused: :blink:
Thanks :)
+1 on it being a scythe stone.
It could be usable, but only if you can manage to use a flat part. If you want to assess its finishing properties, take a razor that shaves well, add a layer of tape to the spine and refinish on the new hone, with 50 laps. This will give a secondary bevel that's completely build by that hone, carrying its keenness limit, final polish and smoothness (or lack thereof). A test shave will tell the truth.
This only has a fair chance if you do it on a perfectly shaving razor with a flat bevel. Don't use a razor that has been pasted.
And of course: please keep us posted?

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

Andreas63

Well-Known Member
Bart said:
Andreas63 said:
...it certainly looks like a scythe...is it suitable for straight razors? :confused: :blink:
Thanks :)
+1 on it being a scythe stone.
It could be usable, but only if you can manage to use a flat part. If you want to assess its finishing properties, take a razor that shaves well, add a layer of tape to the spine and refinish on the new hone, with 50 laps. This will give a secondary bevel that's completely build by that hone, carrying its keenness limit, final polish and smoothness (or lack thereof). A test shave will tell the truth.
This only has a fair chance if you do it on a perfectly shaving razor with a flat bevel. Don't use a razor that has been pasted.
And of course: please keep us posted?

Kind regards,
Bart.
Ok Bart :thumbup: , I have a nice 5/8 Bengall Extra Hollow Ground that will be treated according your advice. I'll try to shave with it saturday morning and I'll let you know.

Kind regards,

Andreas
 

Jens

Well-Known Member
That is a "Lie-bryne" like we say in our country.
Just like you said, used for scythes.

Probably made from Gotländsk sandsten. A sandstone from a big island outside Sweden.
Works like a charm for scyths, axes and so on.
For real scythe honing you also use a "strop" made from birch or some other wood.
A dying art I'm afraid.

No idea on how it would work on a razor.

Here a video on the subject. In Swedish, but atleast OP will have some use of it ;)

http://www.melicamedia.se/lie/bryna.html

//Country-Boy J.
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
I pasted it into google translate. Worked wonders. :D

[box]- För brynet i cirkel så att det dras ut från lien när den dras in på nya områden.
- For the brow of the circle so that it pulled out of Australia when it is pulled into new areas.[/box]
hahaha :lol: :lol:

Matt
 

Andreas63

Well-Known Member
matis said:
I pasted it into google translate. Worked wonders. :D

[box]- För brynet i cirkel så att det dras ut från lien när den dras in på nya områden.
- For the brow of the circle so that it pulled out of Australia when it is pulled into new areas.[/box]
hahaha :lol: :lol:

Matt
:D :D :D

Jens: yes, you are right too. That's a lie-bryne :(
 

Andreas63

Well-Known Member
Andreas63 said:
Bart said:
Andreas63 said:
...it certainly looks like a scythe...is it suitable for straight razors? :confused: :blink:
Thanks :)
+1 on it being a scythe stone.
It could be usable, but only if you can manage to use a flat part. If you want to assess its finishing properties, take a razor that shaves well, add a layer of tape to the spine and refinish on the new hone, with 50 laps. This will give a secondary bevel that's completely build by that hone, carrying its keenness limit, final polish and smoothness (or lack thereof). A test shave will tell the truth.
This only has a fair chance if you do it on a perfectly shaving razor with a flat bevel. Don't use a razor that has been pasted.
And of course: please keep us posted?

Kind regards,
Bart.
Ok Bart :thumbup: , I have a nice 5/8 Bengall Extra Hollow Ground that will be treated according your advice. I'll try to shave with it saturday morning and I'll let you know.

Kind regards,

Andreas
I shaved this morning with one of my coticule razors :) I realized that a shave cannot be better than that...a coticule edge is may be the best...so I could not destroy one of these nice edges with the "lie-bryne". End of the story: I gave it to one of colleagues who is an "amateur-farmer"...I made someone very happy and I kept my nice coti-edges :lol:
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Andreas63 said:
I made someone very happy ...
That, kind sir, fits perfectly in the spirit of this website. :thumbup:
I was curiously awaiting you test results though.:D

Kind regards,
Bart
 

Andreas63

Well-Known Member
Thanks Dr Ralfson&Bart :)

Bart: as you were writing :..."only if you can manage to use a flat part". The flat part was so narrow and the coticule-edges of my razors are so nice so I'm very sorry...I just could not :blush: :blush:
 

Jens

Well-Known Member
I think you did the right thing.

But actually, scythes can be honed to scary sharp using first one of the big rotating sandstones, then this one & then finish of with a thin wooden stick.
I remember when I did some field work in the summers how the old men even used a "pasted" stick (sticka in Swedish)
they rubbed the stick in oil or a piece of tallow & then rubbed fine sand on it, for touch-ups.

It's been maybe 15 years since last time, but if someone here needs a scythe honed, just send it along & I'll hone it for free. You just have to pick up the cost of mailing :lol:

If you haven't done it & ever get the chance, do some scythe work on an open field, its great fun & aren't that far from shaving actually :w00t:
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Yes, it is fun. Allow me to second that.
I don't know about Swedish scythes, but the vintage one I have used (owned by my father in law) has a blade with soft steel. It is hammered to sharpness, on the field, with a special anvil that has a pin to drive it in the soil. Next it is "finished" with a typical scythe stone. The shape is similar to the one shown here, but they're a but longer, I believe than the one of Andreas.
Quite by coincidence, the most famous Belgian scythestones, called "sikéyes" (in Walloon dialect), were mined in an area next to the Coticule area, mostly in the surroundings of Gouvy. There have a pale brown to orange colour, and for there whereabouts are sometimes confused with Coticules. They are much coarser though. In the golden ages of scythes they were mined with 10 000's per year and exported to many countries.

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

danjared

Well-Known Member
I wish it were easier to find something like that here. My SO's family owns a cabin in the middle of Pennsylvania. The scythe there is in horrible condition, and the narrow benchstone that I could find in the cabin just didn't... erm... "cut it". :lol: :lol:

EDIT: You can find scythe stones on eBay, but the ones I've found don't look that good.
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
danjared said:
I wish it were easier to find something like that here. My SO's family owns a cabin in the middle of Pennsylvania. The scythe there is in horrible condition, and the narrow benchstone that I could find in the cabin just didn't... erm... "cut it". :lol: :lol:

EDIT: You can find scythe stones on eBay, but the ones I've found don't look that good.
As I have learned this, the hammering is the important part. The scythestone is just for "touch-ups".
You could read this:
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!
, but also the resource that Smythe posted, appears to have all the necessary information.

Best regards,
Bart.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Wonderful wonderful posts gentlemen :thumbup:
I will keep an eye open for an old scythe stone at our local market, you never know what will turn up there, and forward it with pleasure to you Danjerad.
Best regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 

danjared

Well-Known Member
tat2Ralfy said:
Wonderful wonderful posts gentlemen :thumbup:
I will keep an eye open for an old scythe stone at our local market, you never know what will turn up there, and forward it with pleasure to you Danjerad.
Best regards
Ralfson (Dr)
:thumbup: I'd be quite grateful.
 
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