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TM280

Well-Known Member
Hi,

Since I have started to use this hone, I thought I'd share it with you all.
Les Latneuses 160mm x 45mm (at the widest, approx 20mm min use width on the ends)

This is one of the rocks I brought back from Ardennes. Getting it in shape for hone use required lapping through an inclusion layer and thus exposing the hybrid layer partially. Where the manganese lines are shows the remnants of the creamy layer. I would say about 40% of the current honing surface. Interesting, since there is a slightly variable feedback.

I haven't used it much but it seems to behave much like other Les Latneuses. Difficult slurry generation (for the most part), moderately fast with (misty) slurry, slowish on water, abrasive feedback and a very noticeable change when the edge is ready to move on. It gives an extreme magnetic feel:thumbup:

I don't know about the speed, though... I have been using x strokes mainly since a half stroke is difficult for me with this width. And it still provides a clear and fast dilution progression... But I can say that there is a very high keeness level.

The patterning is mesmerizing, and I don't know if it is clear in the photos but there are a couple fine red threads running through it as well. Here are some pictures.

regards,
Torolf

(Update edit: I just finished fixing up an edge on a very nice, stiff razor I got from Urmas. After some bevel work on a British novoculite, I raised a misty slurry, dilucotted with x stroke switch-ups, finished on water and thought I was there. A strange, silent HHT but only at around 5 mm. Stropped and wasn't so happy with the improvement. Went back and did about 100 x strokes with a drop of wash-up soap and water, just letting the edge skim along the surface of the hone. Silent HHT at about 10 mm over about 60% of the blade, popping at the rest. Stropped and had a hard time putting the hairs down:) It just whiffs the hair away...On to the test shave...

Would I be as happy with the same result on a butt-ugly hone (do they exist?)? Well... I don't know, I think the beauty of some of these rocks can dramatically increase the whole experience.)


Rawcot_2_1.JPG


Rawcot_2_2.JPG


Rawcot_2_3.JPG


Rawcot_2_4.JPG


Rawcot_2_5.JPG
 

DG7

Well-Known Member
Wow, I don't even want to guess what kind of time and effort it took to go from it's raw state to what you have now! Nice pics.
 

wdwrx

Well-Known Member
Gorgeous!
I still think Ardennes should offer a "rustic" line of stones.:thumbup:
I'd love to have something like that one! Though, i'd be tempted to polish it and just display it on the mantle.
 

TM280

Well-Known Member
Hi Gary,

I didn't go back to find the pictures of yours, but I thought it looked remarkably similar.


Re: Rustic: I think they could do well with selling raw sided hones as well. But they are dealing usually with much larger chunks for the type of hones we are looking for. Maybe the edge pieces could be left un-lapped, but i would imagine that could only work for them with combos (not glued to slate, which are cut out afterwards). And, of course, Maurice is not sitting around obsessing over the aesthetics of each individual hone...:rolleyes:

regards,
Torolf
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Beautiful!

I've already made the suggestion to Ardennes, to put raw chunks of Coticule up for sale. Maybe they'll do it when their new website is launched. I understand that the new storefront offer the option to list individual rocks, though I don't know they're going to make use of that option. I'm meeting Maurice next week, and will ask him about it.

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Merde!

I was just thinking of emailing Rob, and asking about getting a chunk

Regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 

TM280

Well-Known Member
Bart said:
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I would much prefer it. Personally, I can't stand the slate backing. I have a slate backed La Dressante that I should get rid of just because I don't use it due to the slate...

But how raw is raw? It's a real crap-shoot with these rocks, trying to make hones from them. We saw that even Maurice can't foresee where a rock is going to split. But something that I think could work well is selling the sawed pieces before they are glued to slate (maybe slightly thicker pieces, but I believe that 20-30 mm is more than strong enough). Here is a picture of bouts waiting to be glued. Most of them were too small to be very good razor hones, but that is just a selection question. No slate equals less work and less materials cost. And I, for one, would rather purchase something like these.


Rawbouts_Ardennes.JPG


regards,
Torolf
 

altshaver

Well-Known Member
TM280, out of curiosity, what do you dislike so much about slate? Do you just prefer the more natural feel of combination stone? Thanks in advance.
 

TM280

Well-Known Member
I think it is the density of it. Visually, I think it is a beautiful stone type, an excellent uniform black. I would like to have it on my steps, for example. But when I pick up a coticule with slate backing it always feels unbalanced to me.

I guess I could try lapping it down to a thinner profile, making it smoother as well...

regards,
Torolf
 

DJKELLY

Well-Known Member
Hi Tor,

Sounds to me like you have been spoiled by the natural coticule's feel and heft, something many of us have never experienced. Wish I had made it to the mine.

Your expectant friend, Denny
 

TM280

Well-Known Member
Hi Denny,

Yes, I guess I sound spoiled...My first coticule was a natural combo, then I bought a slate-backed. At that time it was an advantage since I was still honing on the table. The slate stayed put much better than the lighter combo. I think the real change in my perception came when I started honing with the stone in my hand. Suddenly, my combo felt like a sports car and the slate-backed like a sled...

Strangely enough, the long Les Latneuses I made from another raw rock also gives me some trouble due to its weight. It is about 28 mm thick (but due to an unfortunate chip has to be lapped down a couple of mm now...). I also have a long coticule in a vintage paddle. I have been meaning to take it out of the wood for much the same reasons, though it isn't heavy there is a good deal of bulk to manage during honing.

I think I appreciate much smaller hones now, my concentration is much more on the distinct parts of the edge and much less on the honing surface. I also believe that honing on irregular shaped hones has improved my stroke immensely. I am not sure I could be getting the results I am now if I hadn't begun playing around with bouts, it was a real eye-opener...

regards,
Torolf
 

DJKELLY

Well-Known Member
TM280 said:
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"Spoiled" is in no way a perjorative, Torbo (as Gary would say). I am just jealous. As for honing on big stone, I really don't prefer them at all any more. The narrow la nouvelle veine #30 got my attention when it was up for sale. I have cut several stones to make them narrower just for that maneuverability and extra utility. I think it was Paul that said he had a favorite that was no bigger than a razor box. If you make another les latneuses you want to get rid of, you should offer it up here and start a new business. (Am I skirting Marketplace rules, Ralfy? Not intentionally) Denny
 
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