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Some restoring questions and ideas

Matt

Well-Known Member
Greetings, earthlings! ;)


  1. [li]Yesterday this neat thing arrived at my place:



    Quite a hefty piece of a shaver, the size is that of a DA! The image, due to the particular method, is highly detailed (actually overdetailed I would say), when you hold it it really looks hardly used. If it was not for this damaged edge at the point. :mad: Since my Dremel is on its way, :w00t: :thumbup: do you think I'll be able to handle this chip? It's a full hollow blade.
    [/li]
    [li]Another question about Dremel - will I be able to correct the DA spine problem with it?[/li]
Now, I'm not an experienced restorer at all, yet I'd like to share some ideas with you, maybe someone will have some precious advice.

  1. [li]Compressed air as a cooling agent? It occured to me when I was recently cleaning my keyboard :) - Ray mentioned serious possible problems with overheating hollow blades during polishing. When you hold the can upwards it spits out a stream of liquid air, which really cools down everything it covers. Of course it evaporates in seconds, sou you're left with dry, cold surface (dry as long as air moisture doesn't condense, or even freeze - temps get really low this way!).[/li]
    [li]Pinning / re-pinning. A while ago I decided to tighten a pin in my Solingen SiGi. I applied insulation tape to the scales around the pin to avoid damaging them if I missed the pin with the hammer. When I was done I removed the tape, unfortunately together with the outermost layer of the scales! :scared: It must have been lying in the sunlight, or maybe is just plain old. I guess it's much better to use paper masking tape, the same you use during painting. It has much weaker glue, I tested it yesterday. Or you might want to use some alcohol to weaken the glue prior to removing the tape, although it will probably turn glue into sticky, messy goo. [/li]

kind regards,
Matt
 

torbenbp

Well-Known Member
Nice razor Matis!
On a couple of occations I have used the Dremel for damages very simular to the one on your razor. It must be done very carefull to avoid overheating, but it can surely be done. just take your time and watch the heat. I usually keep my fingers as close as possible to the damage, in that way you can feel the temperature of the metal. And the Dremel is a great tool, but beware of the high speed!


And air as a cooling agent? It will cool it down but really nothing beats water, at least not in private homes. Proffs use water with added coolant.

As for the pinning/repinning..a guy on Ebay sells pins and included with that is a protective sheet, it covers the area around the pin so it will offer some kind of protection..let me see if I can find him again...belive it was this guy: carvermann101 but he has no listing at the moment.

And I`m by no means an expert at this! Please keep that in mind;)
Regards
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Hm, Torben I didn't mean just to blow air on the razor - rather spray liquid air onto it. You won't get water below 0 deg :) - besides are you using water when working with Dremel?

Matt
 

torbenbp

Well-Known Member
haha..no I didnt expect you to blow on the razor. Did think about trying with compressed air but that machinery is noisy as hell so I gave that up.

No havnt used water with the Dremel.. There is something with water and electricity??:rolleyes:
But I do have a flexible shaft for it and I _might_ try it with a small amount of water...well better not..

regards
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Don't hold me for an expert restorer - which I am very much not - yet, I would not use a dremel to chance the shape of the toe on that razors. I would just take it to my DMT (or sandpaper in absence of a DMT) and alter the curve of the point till that small chip is gone. It can be done with a rocking motion, edge and tip straight down. Just look at the curve on the heel and copy that to the tip. It would be hardly noticed once done.

Looks like a nice razor.:thumbup:

This technique requires no cooling, but as far as liquid air is concerned: plain water is cheaper.:rolleyes:

Best regards,
Bart.
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Okay, thanks, now what about that, please?

Another question about Dremel - will I be able to correct the DA spine problem with it?

kind regards,
Matt
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
What is the "DA spine problem"? Are you talking about the DA issue with the shoulder not offering enough clearance to hone the last bit of the heel?

Best regards,
Bart.
 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
Noooooo!!!! don't use the Dremel on that blade!!!... especially near the edge.

Here is a post of mine in an old thread at the SRP workshop, the chip is easily fixed without the "accursed" Dremel.
Note: I did two posts the second one is more detailed with photos and illustrations.
Please, Log in or Register to view URLs content!


matis said:
Okay, thanks, now what about that, please?

Another question about Dremel - will I be able to correct the DA spine problem with it?

kind regards,
Matt
Are you referring to the "hone relief" at the heel?... or lack of it...
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Bart said:
What is the "DA spine problem"? Are you talking about the DA issue with the shoulder not offering enough clearance to hone the last bit of the heel?

Exactly!
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
Matt,
Do not use the Dremel to take care of the chip on the toe, at least no with a grinding wheel. At most, tape the dremel down with a paper sanding disk in it facing you, remembering that the disc will be turning counter clock wise. Turn it on, and at the lowest speed as possible, very easily on the bottom of the disc start sanding the new profile. It would probably be a good idea to mark your new profile on the blade before starting so you have an idea where you want to end up. Have a wet towel handy to cool the blade as needed to keep it from over heating and check it often.

The DA problem can be fixed with a round stone in the dremel and you must be very careful and work the steel very slowly. You can use the same setup and just work the blade on the left side of the stone and only about 2 to 3mm is all you will need to take off.

Again, the key here is to go very slowly and don't let things heat up.

Ray
 

mrmaroon

Well-Known Member
I like rays idea about taping the dremel. However that small of a chip can easily be "honed" out. I bought a romo with a french tip that was bent and turned it into a round point with a 750 grit diamond hone really easy. You could use something similar. Remember, slower and right is better than quick and a letter opener/butterknife.
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
Caleb,
There is an issue with honing the chip out of the tip in this case. This would create an un-natural ending to the toe of the razor. To produce a more asthetic finish, the complete toe needs to be reduced to a correctly proportioned finished. This could still be done with a honing stone like a DMT or any other stone as well though. But I would rather see it look more like its original condition than a simple patch.

Ray
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
mrmaroon said:
I guess thats why the call you the master! :thumbup:
+1... A true professional counsel! Ray, your advice is priceless!

Thank you very much.

kind regards,
Matt
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Hello there gents,

I finally did it on saturday! Ray's idea about taping a Dremel was a fanatastic tip, it virtually turns it into a stationary grinding wheel.

I marked the new profile with a a marker, and started to work the ground part on the cheap knife stone - you should see the grooves this steel was leaving! :) Then I moved to the spine - that was a really hard part, I decided to cut a part of it with a cutting disc, instead of grinding all the 3mm off of it. I also used this disc to do minor corrections to the ground part. Man, that was a really tough job, it took me more than 30-40 minutes to cut through 6 mm of steel, dipping it in the water every 5-8 seconds of cutting. Afterwards I started to round the 'butt' with a grinding stone - much coarser than a cutting disc, however, strangely enough, it was causing minimal heating of the steel. After the crude rounding was done I moved to 500 grit paper - should you ever do a similar work, this is a final chance to do minor corrections the profile, later it's just polishing. Then 1000, 2000 and polishing paste.

I'm particularly proud of this sexy butt :lol: - it looks much better in reality than enlarged 5 times. :)

It isn't surely perfect, but I think it is fine enough for a first job like this :

kind regards,
Matt

------------





 

Smythe

Well-Known Member
Man that's excellent work... the profile looks like it was manufactured that way:w00t:

... are you sure you haven't done this before?
 

mrmaroon

Well-Known Member
Great work matis! I'm thinking of turning my romo back into a french tip. Unfortunatly I will lose the gold wash on the spine part. Maybe i'll wait.
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Bart said:
How does it shave?
:) I didn't do it just for the sake of restoration. :) But I haven't had time to shave with it yet, indeed. However, when I was honing it (as well as cutting!) I noticed particular hardness of this steel. I was attempting dilucot on it, and it passes HHT at 3, however I'm almost certain it can take a better edge than that. Will report on it later.

kind regards,
Matt
 
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