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Swedish razor corrosion, Common??

Toff

Well-Known Member
I would like to ask whether the corrosion, which I find all too common, on Swedish razors is common or restricted to my locality in Wisconsin, USA.

The steel in those I have found seems to generate "devil spit" whatever the makers' brand. Of ten I have found, 8 have mild to severe corrosion at the edge. This seems especially common to the tubular type two piece faux framebacks with a tubular spine added to a thin blade. The problem seems to be significantly higher in the Swedish razors than from any other place of manufacture. Even the highly polished ones seem to attract the corrosion.

Respectfully
~Richard
 

yohannrjm

Well-Known Member
It could be due to:

A) The steel: Swedish steel is renowned for its hardness. This could be due to higher carbon content, which could lead to easier rusting. I know my Japanese knives (with their high carbon content) rust faster than anything else I have. They take an excellent edge, though ---- rather like Swedish blades.

B) The scales: In an enclosed environment, the volatile chamicals from some celluloid scales could cause degradation of the steel. I'm not sure this applies to Swedish razors (I don't know what the scale material tends to be with them), but it is something to consider.

There are other possible reasons, of course, but these two just occurred to me.
 

Toff

Well-Known Member
It does not seem to matter of what material the scales are made, Ivory, to hard rubber, to composition, celluloid or what; nor the era of manufacture. They range from Faux Framebacks to forty year old hi-polish beauties. The worst are the relatively un-polished Faux Framebacks the edges are almost always eaten deeply enough to require removal, of 1 to 2 mm of edge to have stable material that will hold a good edge. I find that, in general, the old Sheffield's seem to survive over time better than the Swedes. Even the newest Hollow ground "Rattlers"(no stabilizer) show easy rusting. The Swedes seem to value the best material they make blades of and use the barest minimum to make a usable razor. That is not my complaint, they, when in good condition are definitely a class act.
Respectfully
~Richard
 
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