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Videos of Tool Sharpening

IsaacRN

Well-Known Member
Has anyone ever come across a video using a coticule for tool sharpening? It would be interesting to see how they are utilized for chisels and the sort. I know there is that one picture of an extremely old and dished coticule that was used by woodworkers.
 

wdwrx

Well-Known Member
I bought one just for my chisels and planes and kitchen and pocket knives. I recieved a bunch of nice wood carving chisels from my Grandfather earlier this winter and I've been slowly working my way through them, getting them all up to snuff. I use it like I've always used work stones, though generally they were never as fine. Just like in razors, i use it for any work above 1000 grit. It's wearing differently, rather unevenly across the surface, but I use that to my advantage with blades with curves and re-curves, and I've got a couple different radius chisels so i want it to function as a slip stone too. It's a bout with five planes so I've got room for different options. but! Let me tell ya... my chisels are insanley sharp! waaayyyyyy sharper than what i need.:D A classic excersice in futility though because they don't stay that sharp very long. The couple I have in my job-site toolbox take a real beating, but they start out shaving arm hair! Using a coticule for that has really elevated those edges to the next level.
I usually start with a VERY heavy slurry, and water it down over three or four really big dilutions, finish on water... same old, same old. I do cheat and use a gauge for planes and chisels.. i"m anal about setting them up square with really crisp corners and a dead flat bevel plane and I just can't do that as well free-hand as I can with the jig.
One thing I do differently from my razors is to strop on a flat piece of latigo treated with TI paste or crox, with a lot of pressure. For my kitchen knives, i go to the hanging strops i pasted with Dovo red and crox, back when i was still messing with pastes:)
Sorry, no video though:D I'm sure youtube's got tons.
 

kinematic

Well-Known Member
What I did was I took a piece of waterproof plywood and I glued a piece of rubber on it. I put a stop on the bottom wich hooks on my workbench. I also put a small stop on top wich together with the rubber stops the stone from moving.
[img=800]1[/img]
 

Emmanuel

Well-Known Member
Isaac . Infuriately I haven’t a video ,but I post some pictures for your information. This musical instrument called <<Cretan Lyre>> and back belly is manufactured of one block wood. I use large gooses to curve the internal area .This block is a very old mulberry wood ,more hard than maple. Is impossible to hone these large gooses on coticule for many reasons. 1) For my opinion is pity to consumed a holly coticule for woodworking tools. Gooses create topical wear due to, you can’t keep the honing in the whole coticule surface 2) Is difficult to keep fixed angle ,on the contrary is very easy to create radium especially in the narrower chisels which(radium) is negative factor for comfortable cutting. Is more easy to hone a plane iron . It is easier if used a guide like the Canadian Verita’s that seems in post picture. Now, to hone my carving tools I need a Tormex.
It looks like grinder ,but actually is a sharpener, working with water keeping the steel cool .



 

Emmanuel

Well-Known Member
[img=800]1[/img]
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[img=800]5[/img]
Best regards
Emmanuel
 

håkan

Active Member
Beautiful pictures of beautiful work, Emmanuel.

Do you "only" build traditional instruments?
 

Matt

Well-Known Member
Emmanuel, I'm astonished with your work and skills. Respect, my friend.[r][small]How is the piece of leather for me? :)[/small][/r]

regards,
Matt
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
Emmanuel, that is lovely work.

I too use a Tormek machine for the sharpening of woodworking tools, but I only use the sharpening wheel and not the leather stropping wheel. The sharpening wheel creates a slightly concave (it's a wheel after all) bevel at 600 grit refinement. It's perfect for further finishing on a Coticule. I do this with the aid of a slurry. I don't use water, and I don't strop the edge. I don't shave with my chisels and plane blades (except for a few arm hairs to check if the edge is good), and I am not interested in the kind of keenness that will vanish as soon as the edge has produced one or two wood shavings. I find the kind of sharpness left by slurry ideal for woodwork. It has great retention, better than an edge that was made too keen for its purpose. In my experience, an edge that keeps a slightly lower level of keenness will perform better than one that fell back from an originally too delicate state. That's why I don't bother with water and why I don't strop. Unless the edge is honed at the same side for a long time, a Coticule doesn't raise a burr either.

I touch up my edges soon rather than late. At first, the concave bevel helps me to keep the edge stable on the hone, since it rests only on both ends of the concave arc. This works well on chisels and thick plane blades, because they carry wide bevels. Cutters with narrower bevels are harder to control. On those I create a secondary bevel at slightly increased angle.

Eventually this freehanded approach leads to a convexity of the bevel, after a fair amount of touch-ups. At that point, it's time for the Tormek machine.

Kind regards,
Bart.
 

IsaacRN

Well-Known Member
Absolutely wonderful craftsmanship on the instrument. I feel honored that you would share it with us. Thank you so very much for the pictures.
 

Snuff

Well-Known Member
You are one talented man, some people have magical hands.
 

Chasmo

Member
Emmanuel,
That’s very nice work on the instrument. Did you make the gouges too? They look like they were hammered out and the handles turned by a resourceful craftsman. Well done.

With Respect
Chasmo
 

Emmanuel

Well-Known Member
Mates ,thank you very much for the kind words.
Hakan .I make Violins,Alto(violas),Lyres.Lutes and classic and flamenco Guitars.
Chasmo .No i didn't make these gooses.Are manufactured by a Swedish smith.Is a high quality tools but indeed expensive.
Bart I dont use more the 600 grinder.I replaced it by another 4000 (pistachio color).No more used too the stroping wheel and the tormex compound. After honing i just finish the edges with a coticule slurry stone due to is small and handy .
Best regards
Emmanuel
 
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