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Water spot removal ?

The*Cincinnati*Kid

Well-Known Member
I just got a razor in the mail from ebay yesterday. A Joseph Rodgers & sons 6/8 near wedge that I knew was going to need some TLC when bidding, witch is pretty obvious in these before pictures.
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I signed up for some free samples at flitz.com and they sent two small towlet packs full. I seperated the blade from the scales, & with a golf towel and allot of elbow grease(hr & a half worth) I managed to end up with these results. 000_0002.jpg 000_0003.jpg 000_0009.jpg 000_0010.jpg

There are still some visible water stains, and my question is is it possible to get rid of these without grinding on the blade to remove them?

Thanks guys,
Louis
 

BlacknTan

Well-Known Member
I've had pretty good luck with fine stainless steel wire brushes. You can generally find them in any welding supply. It will not eliminate the pitting, but it can make it far less noticable. But, be very careful near the edge.
To be completely honest, I much prefer to see sharp corners as original to everything rounded from being polished into oblivion on a buffing wheel.

You're blade, IMHO, shows character, class and honest wear from a lifetime of good use!
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
Louis,
I simply start with 600 grit sandpaper, then go to 1000, then 1500, then 2000. That sequence will remove what it can. Sometimes you will just not be able to remove it all, and so what? As long as the blade is clean and doesn't have any rust on it I like to think of this discoloration as simply "patina".

I polish blades only if requested by the owner. My opinion is to leave both the blade and the scales as close to original as possible. Somehow the Acrylics, G-10 and other materials seem to take away the richness and time period of the original product. It's kind of like rebuilding a 1957 Chevy with plastic parts from China.

Ray
 

DJKELLY

Well-Known Member
I also think you have gone far enough, for me, that is. Patina, water marks and other imperfections add to the character of an antique and you could say it has "earned" them. Kinda like my extra 15 pounds since I was thirty. Being a Rodgers, I would think it likely it is a very fine shaver, which would make me overlook any blemish. YT, Denny
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
rayman said:
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Absolutely :thumbup:

I use greaseless compounds on mops, 80-150-300 grit, I dont often use the first two if I can help it, from there I go to polishing compounds, grey on a sisal mop, brown on stitched cotton, and finish with green on soft cotton, the whole process takes about an hour tops.

Sometimes I go for a full polish, and spend more time but I very rarely try to get every little mark out, I believe that clean and shiny doesnt have to mean I have removed all traces of age, to me a 100 year old razor should look like its 100 years old.

Regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 

The*Cincinnati*Kid

Well-Known Member
I appreciate the advice guys, I'm going to leave it as is. Only thing left to do is to try and re-peen it with the original pin.

Thanks fellas,
Louis.
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
Don't even try to re-pin that blade until you fix the hole in the tang. This will require some epoxy and a small piece of 1/16" ID. brass tubing. If you try and pin the blade the way it is now, the pin will bend and the blade will wobble back and forth in the scales.

Ray
 

The*Cincinnati*Kid

Well-Known Member
Thanks Ray, I was wondering why/how the original pin got bent. Is it ok to straighten & use it? Also all I have on hand is Gorilla Glue will that work? If not can you recommend an epoxy to use or witch you have had the best experience with?

Thanks,
Louis
 

janivar123

Well-Known Member
slow curing Araldite will work, may be other 2 component epoxy glues but i dont know the names
or a piece of silver or brass hammered to expand in the hole
(that require a drill tho,preferably a drill press)
or gluing in the tubing

No i dont think you can use the old pin bending will have weakened it, and how did you get it out without shortening it
 

wdwrx

Well-Known Member
Ralfy figured out a killer way to fix oversized holes in tangs, doesn't require epoxy, but you need to take the time to make one of
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With the jig, simply cut a bit of 1/16" ID tubing to a bit longer than the width of the tang, and use the jig to deform the tubing into the hole. The brass is soft enough to expand into the hole and lock itself in there, and with the guide thingy, it can't expand into the inside at all. It might take a bit of trial and error to get the length right, but makes for a very cheap, durable and wobble free fix.
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
A simple method is to tape one side of the tang, to cover the hole, then fill the hole with 5 min. Epoxy. You don't need to over fill the hole. Set the blade aside and come back to it tomorrow. Seems the epoxy is much harder the next day.

Remove the tape and drill the hole for the brass tube. Make sure you allow for any taper in the tang. Insert the rod and cut off even with the edge of both sides. Done.

Ray
 

The*Cincinnati*Kid

Well-Known Member
OK that sounds simple enough. I stopped by the hardware store and asked if they carried 1/16" brass rod & 1/16" ID tubing/washers to fit that and they didn't carry it, gonna try a craft store tomorrow but if they don't have what I need do is ordering off online my last hope?
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This gives me an idea & one more place to stop, local gun repair shop.

Louis.
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
Ace hardware carries both. If you can't find it, let me know and I will send you a piece of both. Or better yet, send me the blade and scales and I will hone it for you after I put it back together. Your choice.

Ray
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
Louis,
The scales you have are not worth trying to salvage. I am going to re-mount your razor in a set of scales I just happen to have on hand. They aren't that great, but you will be able to use your razor when I am finished with it.

Ray
 

The*Cincinnati*Kid

Well-Known Member
Sounds good to me ray, I appreciate your generosity. I hope you didn't waste any of your holiday time on my razor brother.

Thanks, Happy New Year
Louis.
 

rayman

Well-Known Member
Louis,
Your razor is done and I will take it to the Post Office tomorrow. I want to check the amount of postage you put on it and make sure it doesn't come back to me.

This took a little longer than I expected because of the chip in the toe. I had to breadknife it and re-contour the edge. It is an easy HHT4-5 now and you should enjoy the shave.

Regards,

Ray
 
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