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For the sensitive skins

G

Guest

Always wanted to write a post on the protection of sensitive skins ,because I don't believe the irritations, redness or burning does not caused by the product but by the shave way.Many create lather in a circular motions over their face,after first loading the brush with soap or shaving cream.This leads to lift up the hair and opens the nipples,so if you'll shave under these conditions , it is mathematically proven that you'll have a (pizza face) skin and inside growing hair.The shaving angle has been analyzed many times in a previus threads so i ll not focus on it.My suggestion is as follows:Upload your brush with shaving soap or cream (no matter what),create a rich lather but not thick in mug(suggested double wall) if does not exist use a thick ceramic mug which first has preheated with a hot water to keep the lather warm.Apply the lather on your face like to paint a surface following the direction of your beard. If you need second or third pass do the same .The lather should leave transparent exposures on your face.
Rinsing the blade should not leave white spots(on the blade), if so this means that the lather is dried and is necessary to relather .I thing that the bristle brushes produce richer lather in the mug but are unsuitable to rub lather over your face.It appears that those mentioned above
is known simply.I personally believe that many do not apply because they consider the is not important.In the photos appears a lather prodused by a brisle brush from a palmolive soap in a double wall porcelain mug .I remember corectly Mat and Chris declare very sensitive skin.
Best regards
Emmanuel


 
G

Guest

Sterling stuff, Emmanuel. Two things:

  1. [li]High quality badger brushes should not be used for face lathering. Their tips will either break, or at least roll up. I have always used the paintbrush method.[/li]
    [li]Where did you get that scuttle? My shaving mug broke before Christmas, and I have been looking for a suitable replacement ever since. This one looks perfect (if that brush has a 24mm or wider knot). Would you care to share its provenance? Please?[/li]
Many thanks,
Robin
 
G

Guest

BeBerlin said:
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Stay Robin because i dig my mind where i bought this mug is not a my father heritage . i have to ask my wife(she is sleeping). If is bought here i can poromish that i ll send you one as soon as i can if is purchased from eshop ill keep you informed.The brush knot is 26mm.
Emmanuel
 

BlacknTan

Well-Known Member
You always post highly pertinent and usable information, Emmanuel...

Thank you for the tip!

And, that scuttle is quite beautiful.
 

wdwrx

Well-Known Member
Thanks Emmanuel.
I'l give this a try next time. I've been face lathering ever since I got that nice little brush from Gerrit, and having some excellent shaves with Irish Moos (in a stick) but I'm still very prone to in-growns. I've been following Robin's advice in regards to lightening up on the pressure to good effect, but every little bit helps. I'll grate some into a bowl and try lathering that way.
The idea has some fundamental differences from the way I've been doing it too, for instance lathering with the grain is exactly the opposite of what I've been doing.
 

kessel113

Well-Known Member
Emmanuel scuttle is beautifull, i dint find it online. i did find some nice ones.

http://www.sarabonnymanpottery.com/moss_scuttle.htm[url] [url]http://www.schwarzweisskeramik.de/[url] [url]http://www.georgetownpottery.com/store/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=GTP&Product_Code=SHAV0001&Category_Code=Shaving[url] [url]http://www.irishbarber.com/Porcelain-Mugs-Bowls/View-all-products.html[url] [url]http://www.hgpottery.yolasite.com/[url] [url]http://www.etsy.com/listing/64841336/handthrown-shaving-scuttle-in-light[url] [url]http://www.heimerdingercutlery.com/shaving-products-shaving-scuttles-c-43_298.html[url]
 
G

Guest

Thank you both very much. Emmanuel's is by far the best looking one, but the Georgetown ivory looks acceptable, too. Please bear in mind that it has to fit in to this bathroom, and the hillbilly specimens just won't fit ;)

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Matt

Well-Known Member
kg4ghn said:
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I, on the contrary, am a bit put off. :) But I know it's been there for years and is a true heritage, so I respect it for just this reason, if not any other. But that's not the main case here.

Emmanuel, stellar post, thank you very much for that. Robin, your hint on zero pressure at ingrown-prone areas is well remembered, too. Although I usually use brush just for making lather in the bowl and then it serves merely as a means to transfer the lather onto my face, from time to time I'm tempted to do a little swirling. Now I know it's not a good idea.

As for translucent lather - although I have a new premier sythetic men-u brush, which is capable of producing really fine lather, I have never been able to make thin, more watery lather that would last longer on my face. By the time I finish 1/4 or 1/2 of a pass at max, the rest seems to slowly dry.

emmanuel said:
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Maybe this the key, more water and even more whipping?

kind regards,
Matt
 

altshaver

Well-Known Member
Emmanuel, thank you for posting. I believe you are using a large Omega professional grade boar bristle brush. That brush will get better with time. Be sure to soak it for a few minutes before using it. In time, it will need less time for soaking. Also, the bristles will split with use, making the brush very soft on the face. I have to say that I have been preferring my Semogue Owner's Club boar brush much more than my badger hair brushes.

Here is a really good post on boar brushes:

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I, too, am more the bowl-lathering, paint-brushing type of wet-shaver. Here is a nice article on brush wear and tear:

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BeBerlin, I like your bathroom counter. Is it made of real marble? Do you know how old it is?
 

decraew

Well-Known Member
emmanuel said:
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Funny that. I tend to make my lather thicker (because I like it that way), it doesn't rince off without wiping with my fingers. This also means that sometimes in the middle of a shave I need to relather but that's not a big deal for me.

I'll try your consistency and see what difference it gives comfortwise.
 
G

Guest

BeBerlin said:
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Robin The scuttle was bought from Conaught shaving.Was existed in two color, ivory and grafit.
And listen, the irony is, called <German double wall mug> that means have been menufactured in your country .I thing was supplied by the german supplier that linked by Kessel .In Conaught shaving no more available , if you are not covered by the found links and you are stil fan for the mine i can ship it to you.
Best regards
Emmanuel
 
G

Guest

Chris and Matt go ahead as suggested keeping me informed what about. Matt i believe that the polish water is very hard as the balgian that i know very well. However in Poland its rain
too much so try a liitle with rainwater and bet for a kilo of Polskich kiełbas that you will find a large different.
Best regards
Emmanuel
 
G

Guest

Thank you very much, Emmanuel. Most kind offer, and greatly appreciated. But I just learned that my old bowl has become available again. Hallelujah! Too bad Connaught don't offer yours anymore - I like it a lot.

Matt, maybe this will placate you:

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And yes, that is one giant piece of marble, 1926 or earlier.

Best wishes,
Robin
 

danjared

Well-Known Member
emmanuel said:
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The water over here is very hard too. Things that are wet dry off with a film of white on them from the calcium and other minerals (sorry, don't know what Uranium looks like). Alas, we hardly get any rain, being in a desert.

I do find, though, with a bit of playing, it is possible to get a thin, almost runny lather. It just takes patience.
 
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