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maybe a stupid question

geruchtemoaker

Well-Known Member
I was wondering what you use to coat your razors in when you're storing them until now I just let them dry in my chamber until the next time I needed them. But since I have the habit of not shaving during the exams, I thought it would be better to coat them in maybe some sort of oil to prevent corrosion on the edge.

kind regards
Stijn
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
There are no stupid questions here Stijn

I use gun oil, because I have it, and it works well for me, all of my razors live in the spare room, and we dry clothes there during the winter, with the window open of course, but it gets a little humid, some of my blades dont get used for up to 2 months, and none ever show any rust

Best regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 

Bart

Well-Known Member
I use "naaimachine" oil, Stijn. It's a mineral oil. I think anything that sufficiently seals the blade from air and moisture will be fine.

groetjes,
Bart.
 

RicTic

Well-Known Member
I use Ballistol, (came free with a razor from RasurPur) which I assume, is the gun oil Ralfy is referring too?
All are kept in my bedroom and non have ever shown any signs of rust.
 

DJKELLY

Well-Known Member
Ballistrol is a very unique oil that is so pure it is actually drinkable! It is used for guns, reels and myriad other applications. Some say it was invented to replace whale oil, which was the very best substance to use in fishing reels or so the old timers said.

There is one other trick that is worth noting. If you keep razors in an enclosed space like a storage box or plastic bag, regular moth balls work wonders. It is an old mechanics trick for keeping the contents of their toolboxes from rusting. They release camphor oil very slowly for a long time.

Personally, I use and Altoids tin with a folded piece of terry cloth charged with camelia oil, only because it is highly recommended for Japanese chisels and plane irons, of which I have many, but everyone is correct in that almost any oil, including honing oil, works fine. Just be careful not to use a vegetable oil which will turn rancid and thick after a while.

If you can stand the smell, WD40 is cheap and much more effective as a rust preventive than as a lubricant/penetrant. It makes me gag and reminds me of another time of life when I was a mechanic. Kinda like smelling a crayon.

Jeeze, ask me the time....D
 
G

Guest

Denny my friend no more WD40 .Now i am retired .
Best Regards
Emmanuel
 

DJKELLY

Well-Known Member
emmanuel said:
Please, Log in or Register to view quote content!
I know exactly what you are saying, Emmanuel. When I retire I will not miss the smell of JP when they bring me the fuel slip.
I am waiting for DOG, DOG, not AOG.

Your aviating friend, Denny
 

Gunner777

Well-Known Member
15.574.58.jpg


Camellia Oil
 
G

Guest

I cannot find the picture any more, but I once saw a Japanese contraption made out of bamboo with some cotton inside, and a bamboo lid. The cotton was drenched with oil, and the guy used it to oil his razors. Stylish in a Far Eastern way, and highly useful.

While I am not sure old fashioned mothballs still exist over here (I miss the smell, reminds me of our holiday home on Pelion, Greece), those little bags with chemical stuff in them you find in boxes for electronics equipment work well, too. You can get them in (duh!) electronics stores, and they last for quite some time.

Regards,
Robin
 

tat2Ralfy

Well-Known Member
Heres the stuff I use, described as a light mineral oil, which tells me very little:

express-gun-oil_51D05E4D_std.jpg

And the stuff in little packets, that comes packed with electric goods, is Silica Gel, it works by absorbing moisture, and as such has a finite life, it gets full and doesn't work anymore.

Silica_Gel_desiccant_for_packaging.jpg

Regards
Ralfson (Dr)
 

geruchtemoaker

Well-Known Member
I know the cilica gel but since they just lay an my dresser and not in a box I don't think they are of much use

will look into the sewer oil(meaning looking if we have laying around here of which I think there's a fairly big chance) otherwise I'll go for the baby oil

thanks for all the responses!

kind regards,
Stijn
 

Tok

Well-Known Member
I´d be careful with the "every oil works" thing. Some vegetable oils may contain acids. Most vegetable oils get hard or sticky after some time(<--Linen oil as a wood polish). Camelia oil is well known for covering steel. I don´t know how mineral oils or baby oil behave; I use Ballistol (AFAIK 100% vegetable, too). Oils that are made to treat metal parts of machines should be very ok, though. So, don´t use your olive or sunflower seeds oil;)

Regards,
Tok
 

geruchtemoaker

Well-Known Member
I found a bottle of singer super oil use: sewing machines, drills, bicycles, typewriters, cars and guns
I guess this is safe?

regards,
Stijn
 

BlacknTan

Well-Known Member
I use camelia oil at the moment for razors that are in regular usage. I don't really know why, other than the fact that it was recommended for straight razors, and because the small bottle I bought will last the rest of my life! I find it to be no better than mineral oil, but as Bart said, all we need to do is keep moisture and air away from the steel.
For long term storage, I favor gun oil or a gun grease. The products designed for firearms have no additives that could possibly stain the metal, and additives are the things in oil we need to be wary of.
Years ago, the Trapshooters all started using Wolf's Head motor oil on their fine target guns. One of them had read in one of the magazines that the lubricity of this particular oil, never a top of the line product in it's niche to begin with, was better that the engineered oils designed for firearms.
Well, many had the highly polished actions of their guns stained by one of the additives in the oil. Not surprising when one thinks about it.. The internal moving parts of an automobile engine do not need to impress anyone with their highly polished beauty.
At any rate, I tend to stay with purpose designed products, or ones with the same objectives.
 
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